Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Bacon or search for Bacon in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
for minor offences, and was active in the Temperance reform. He was an enthusiastic student of Bacon, editing the works, and writing the life of the philosopher. His edition was the text of Macaulo Hawthorne; at which were present Mr. Fields, Kinglake, and Leigh Hunt. Mr. Montagu was full of Bacon, and told me it was said of him that in a quarrel with the keeper of a turnpike gate he would quote Bacon! He invited me to go with him to visit Bacon's mansion about twenty miles from London. Mrs. Montagu is a remarkable woman. As ever yours, C. S. P. S. What will be my prospects at Bacon's mansion about twenty miles from London. Mrs. Montagu is a remarkable woman. As ever yours, C. S. P. S. What will be my prospects at the bar on my return? Will they say I am spoiled? I have received a most friendly letter from Miss Edge-worth, expressing her regret that I did not visit her in Ireland, and inviting me there if I glorious apartment, where I look upon the busts of Milton and Shakspeare, of Locke and Burke, of Bacon and Newton! It was not long since I saw Bulwer writing here; and when he threw down the pen he
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, December 5. (search)
bolish capital executions for minor offences, and was active in the Temperance reform. He was an enthusiastic student of Bacon, editing the works, and writing the life of the philosopher. His edition was the text of Macaulay's famous article in ther given by Mr. Procter to Hawthorne; at which were present Mr. Fields, Kinglake, and Leigh Hunt. Mr. Montagu was full of Bacon, and told me it was said of him that in a quarrel with the keeper of a turnpike gate he would quote Bacon! He invited metold me it was said of him that in a quarrel with the keeper of a turnpike gate he would quote Bacon! He invited me to go with him to visit Bacon's mansion about twenty miles from London. Mrs. Montagu is a remarkable woman. As ever yours, C. S.told me it was said of him that in a quarrel with the keeper of a turnpike gate he would quote Bacon! He invited me to go with him to visit Bacon's mansion about twenty miles from London. Mrs. Montagu is a remarkable woman. As ever yours, C. S.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. (search)
Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. Again in town and in this glorious apartment, where I look upon the busts of Milton and Shakspeare, of Locke and Burke, of Bacon and Newton! It was not long since I saw Bulwer writing here; and when he threw down the pen he had been using, the thought crossed my mind to appropriate it, and make my fortune by selling it to some of his absurd admirers in America. But I let the goose-quill sleep. What a different person I have just been conversing with for three hours or more!—Basil Montagu; one of the sweetest men, with honeyed discourse, that I ever met. His mind is running over with beautiful images and with boundless illustration and allusion. He has known as bosom friends Mackintosh, Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Lord Eldon; and he pours out his heart, as I freely mention their names, like water. He has just published a charming little book, entitled, Essays and Selections; and he has given me a copy, in which he has written my name, with the af
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
Basil Montagu's. He is simple in his habits, never dines out, or gives dinners. I step into his house, perhaps, after I have been dining out, at ten or eleven o'clock in the evening; and we talk till I am obliged to say good morning, and not good night. The Montagus have been intimate with more good and great people than anybody I know. Mackintosh, Coleridge, Parr, Wordsworth, Lamb, were all familiar at their fireside. Mr. Montagu is often pronounced a bore, because he perpetually quotes Bacon and the ancient English authors. But it is a pleasure to me to hear some of those noble sentences come almost mended from his beautiful flowing enunciation. Mrs. M. is one of the most remarkable women I have ever known. Dr. Parr always called Mr. Montagu by his Christian name, Basil; and his wife, Basilissa; and their son, who was no favorite with him, Basilisk. Mrs. M. told me an interesting story connected with Carlyle, which somewhat explains the singular style of his French Revoluti
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
Basil Montagu's. He is simple in his habits, never dines out, or gives dinners. I step into his house, perhaps, after I have been dining out, at ten or eleven o'clock in the evening; and we talk till I am obliged to say good morning, and not good night. The Montagus have been intimate with more good and great people than anybody I know. Mackintosh, Coleridge, Parr, Wordsworth, Lamb, were all familiar at their fireside. Mr. Montagu is often pronounced a bore, because he perpetually quotes Bacon and the ancient English authors. But it is a pleasure to me to hear some of those noble sentences come almost mended from his beautiful flowing enunciation. Mrs. M. is one of the most remarkable women I have ever known. Dr. Parr always called Mr. Montagu by his Christian name, Basil; and his wife, Basilissa; and their son, who was no favorite with him, Basilisk. Mrs. M. told me an interesting story connected with Carlyle, which somewhat explains the singular style of his French Revoluti