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nicious notions, fatal to the 1703 royal prerogative, were improving daily; and, though Quarry Virginia protested against the charge of republicanism, as an unfounded reproach, yet colonial opinion, the offspring of free inquiry, which seclusion awakened, the woods sheltered, and the self — will of slaveholders fortified, was more than a counterpoise to the prerogative of the British crown. In former ages, no colony had ever enjoyed a happier freedom. From the days of the insurrection of Bacon, for a period of three quarters of a century, Virginia possessed uninterrupted peace. On its own soil, the strife with the Indians was ended; the French hesitated to invade the western frontier, on which they lowered: if sometimes alarm was spread by privateers upon the coast, a naval foe 1709 was not attracted to a region which had neither town 1710 nor magazines, where there was nothing to destroy but a field of tobacco, nothing to plunder but the frugal stores of scattered plantations.
language—thus Lawson, 171. establishing Cape Fear as the southern limit of the Algonquin speech. In Virginia, the same language was heard throughout the whole dominion of Powhatan, which had the Chap. XXII.} tribes of the Eastern Shore as its dependencies, and included all the villages west of the Chesapeake, from the most southern tributaries of James River to the Patuxent. The power of the little empire was entirely broken in the days of Opechancanough; and after the insurrection of Bacon, the confederacy disappears from history. The Shawnees connect the south-eastern Algonquins with the west. The basin of the Cumberland River is marked by the earliest French geographers as the home of this restless nation of wanderers. A part of them afterwards had their cabins and their Kircheval, 53. springs in the neighborhood of Winchester. Their principal band removed from their hunting-fields in Kentucky to the head waters of one of the great rivers Lawson, 171. of South Caroli
amiable enthusiast Anthony Benezet. But did not Christianity enfranchise its converts? The Christian world of that day almost universally revered in Christ the impersonation of the divine wisdom. Could an intelligent being, who, through the Mediator, had participated in the Spirit of God, and, Chap. XXIV.} by his own inward experience, had become conscious of a Supreme Existence, and of relations between that Existence and humanity, be rightfully held in Berkeley's Works, III. 247. Bacon's Laws of Maryland. Laws o S. Carolina, 1712. Dalcho. 94, &c. bondage? From New England to Carolina, the notion prevailed, that being baptized is inconsistent with a state of slavery; and this early apprehension proved a main obstacle to the culture and conversion of these poor people. The sentiment was so deep and so general, that South Carolina in 1712, Maryland in 1715, Virginia repeatedly from 1667 to Hen. II. 260; III. 448, &c. 1748, gave a negative to it by special enactments. Th
B. Bacon, Lord, tolerant, I. 294. Inclines to materialism, II. 329. Bacon, Nathaniel, his cereer, II. 217-228. Baltimore. See Calvert. Bank of England chartered, III. 191 Bank of France, III. 354. Barclay, Robert, governor of New Jersey, II. 414. Barlow, his voyage, I. 92. Behring's discoveries, III. 453.Bacon, Nathaniel, his cereer, II. 217-228. Baltimore. See Calvert. Bank of England chartered, III. 191 Bank of France, III. 354. Barclay, Robert, governor of New Jersey, II. 414. Barlow, his voyage, I. 92. Behring's discoveries, III. 453. Bellamont, Lord, in New York, III. 59. In New England, 82. Berkeley, George, character of, III. 372. Berkeley, Sir William, in Virginia, I. 203. In England, II. 68. Plants Carolina, 134. Dissatisfied, 203. His severity to Bacon and his friends, 219, 221, 231. Sails for Europe, 233. Bienville, III. 200. Explores Bacon and his friends, 219, 221, 231. Sails for Europe, 233. Bienville, III. 200. Explores the country, 202. Blake, Joseph, II. 172. Bloody Brook, II. 104. Boston founded, I. 356. Antinomian, 388. Its liberality, II. 109. Insurgent, 447. Bourdonnais, La, III. 453. Brackett, Anne, II. 110. Bradford, William, I. 314. Bradstreet, Simon, II. 74. Brebeuf, Father, III. 122. Character, 124. Martyrdo
estoration, 195. Royalist assembly, 196. Navigation act oppressive, 198. A state religion established, 200. Its judiciary irresponsible, 204. Abolishes universal suffrage, 207. Given to Lord Culpepper, 209. Contests with the Indians, 215. Bacon's rebellion, 218. Bacon's assembly, 218. Effects of its rebellion, 233. Culpepper's administration, 245. Lord Howard's, 249. Despotism of James II., 252. Resisted, 255. Effect of the revolution of 1688, III. 25. The church, 27. Character irresponsible, 204. Abolishes universal suffrage, 207. Given to Lord Culpepper, 209. Contests with the Indians, 215. Bacon's rebellion, 218. Bacon's assembly, 218. Effects of its rebellion, 233. Culpepper's administration, 245. Lord Howard's, 249. Despotism of James II., 252. Resisted, 255. Effect of the revolution of 1688, III. 25. The church, 27. Character of its people, 28. Had no stockjobbers, 396 Its treaty with the Six Nations, 455. Vries, De, plants the Delaware, II. 281