Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for A. P. Bagby or search for A. P. Bagby in all documents.

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by the Texas and Louisiana troops under the command of Gen. Dick Taylor, the son of Old Rough-and-Ready President Taylor. From General Taylor's report it is learned that the following Texas forces were in the battle of Mansfield and that of Pleasant Hill, which took place on the next day: Maj.--Gen. John G. Walker's infantry division, including the three brigades of Gens. T. N. Waul, Wm. R. Scurry and Horace Randal; Gen. Tom Green's cavalry command, consisting of his old brigade under Colonel Bagby and General Major's brigade; Waller's battalion, Buchel's, Hardeman's, Terrell's, Debray's and McNeill's cavalry regiments (Gen. H. P. Bee had command ,of a part of this cavalry), Brigadier-General Polignac's infantry brigade, and Mosely's, McMahon's and the Valverde batteries. The battle of Mansfield was glorious in its timely conception, wise plan of attack, splendid execution, and victorious result that sent the confident invader with his whole host back on the road he came; and th
on the 13th the services of Colonels Green and Bagby and their commands were specially noticed. Caso conspicuous in the fight, was wounded. Colonel Bagby, though seriously wounded in the arm, remardeman's regiment; Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert, Bagby's; Capt. H. A. McPhail, the Fourth, Fifth and le line; Major's brigade was on the right, and Bagby's in the center. Roberts began the attack ands deserves great credit. At the same hour Colonel Bagby, commanding his own, McNeill's and some co consisting of his brigade under Colonel Lane, Bagby's brigade, Vincent's brigade of Louisiana cavaourage of our troops. Green, Polignac, Major, Bagby and Randal on the left, Walker, Bee, Scurry anund to the left with his dismounted cavalry of Bagby's and his own brigade, under Colonel Terrell (m. of the 11th. The same difficulty which met Bagby in the passage of the Bayou Pierre, namely, thvision and General Major's division (including Bagby's and Debray's brigades), in all about 2,000 m[4 more...]
aval expedition, in which every officer and man won imperishable renown. Gen. Richard Taylor, during his operations in West Louisiana in 1863, frequently spoke of Bagby in complimentary terms. Referring to the battle near Berwick bay, he said: Colonel Bagby was wounded seriously, but not dangerously, in the arm, but remained on tColonel Bagby was wounded seriously, but not dangerously, in the arm, but remained on the field with his regiment until the enemy had been driven back and ceased his attacks. So frequently is Colonel Bagby's gallantry alluded to in the reports of both Taylor and Magruder that it is certain that the rank of brigadier-general, which was conferred upon him during 1863, seldom if ever was bestowed upon one more worthy Colonel Bagby's gallantry alluded to in the reports of both Taylor and Magruder that it is certain that the rank of brigadier-general, which was conferred upon him during 1863, seldom if ever was bestowed upon one more worthy of the honor. During the Red river campaign, before, during and after the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, his services were very great. The high esteem in which he was held by his superior officers is shown by the fact that after the surrender of Lee and Johnston, but before the final submission of the Trans-Mississippi d