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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
ams. Mr. Seward replied:— You will perhaps wonder at the deference I pay you; but I pray you to believe that it comes from a profound respect for your judgment as a scholar and as a moralist. If you knew me better, you would know that I am but occasionally and incidentally engaged as either the one or the other. my life is one of action, not of speculation. I pray you accept assurances, which nevertheless I hope are unnecessary, of decided respect and cordial friendship. Dr. Gamaliel Bailey, editor of the National Era, Washington, D. C., in writing to Sumner, May 31, 1848, upon various political matters, added: Do let me say that there is no one in New England whose productions I have read with so much unalloyed pleasure. William W. Story had now established his home in Italy; but in 1851 he was in Boston carrying his Life of his father through the press,—a work in which Sumner naturally took a great interest. During his last days in the country he took a crayon like
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
one of the best Speakers who ever filled that eminent chair; and even the antislavery men were not entirely agreed that he did injustice in his appointments of committees by which questions concerning slavery were to be considered. Horace Mann thought him fair in this respect; Letter to Sumner, Jan. 9, 1850. Mann's view of Winthrop later was less favorable. Mann's Life, pp. 283-286, 289, 310. and though not considering him as satisfactory as he could wish, voted for him in 1849; and Dr. Bailey of the National Era, Jan. 3, 1850. who on the spot kept a sharp eye on such matters, concurred in Mr. Mann's view as to one committee, but thought otherwise as to two others. At this distance from the controversy, which left many stings behind, and after trying to judge it fairly, this may be considered a just conclusion: Winthrop was placed in the chair by his party as a whole, by the votes of Southern as well as Northern members, and could not be expected to discriminate between the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
e Wish of To-day. in the last Era has touched my heart. May God preserve you in strength and courage for all good works! . . . The literature of the world is turning against slavery. We shall have it soon in a state of moral blockade. I admire Bailey Dr. Bailey, of the National Era. as an editor very much. His articles show infinite sagacity and tact. . . .But I took my pen merely to inquire after your health. There are few to whom I would allot a larger measure of the world's blessings Dr. Bailey, of the National Era. as an editor very much. His articles show infinite sagacity and tact. . . .But I took my pen merely to inquire after your health. There are few to whom I would allot a larger measure of the world's blessings than to yourself had I any control, for there are few who deserve them more. To Charles Allen, Jan. 3, 1849:— I cannot forbear expressing to you my joy in the recent election in the Worcester district. Your triumph is a complete vindication of your own personal position, while it insures to our cause an influence over our State and in Congress which it would be difficult to estimate. I wish much that Mr. Palfrey had been returned. He is sure to succeed another time. Palfrey fail
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 34: the compromise of 1850.—Mr. Webster. (search)
in the shape of separate bills. Their success was promoted by the co-operation of Fillmore, who became President on the death of Taylor, July 9. The latter had been an obstruction, as he desired the admission of California independently, and not as part of a scheme or bargain; and soldier and patriot as he was, with all his limitations as a Southern planter, he was ready to compel Texas by force of arms to respect the territory of New Mexico instead of bribing her to keep the peace. Dr. Bailey wrote Sumner, July 5, 1850, that General Taylor had been growing more and more Northern in sentiment, and had become a most formidable obstacle to a compromise. Horace Mann took the same view of Taylor. (Mann's Life, pp. 305, 307, 322.) But in the end the General's negative policy would have fallen between the positive forces arrayed against each other. See Boston Republican, June 27, 1850. California being entitled by all precedents to admission without an offset, Clay's Compromise mea
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
Webster. The decisive rout of the Whigs was due to the support of the Compromise and of Webster by the party in Boston, and its ambiguous position in other parts of the State. Emancipator and Republican, Boston Atlas, November 14 and 15. Dr. Bailey wrote to Sumner, November 27, You have whipped Webster. The Courier and Advertiser, which had insisted that the Fugitive Slave law was a part of Whig policy, had repelled Whig voters who would not acquiesce in its inhuman provisions. Webster dhe election, as a rebuke of Webster and Winthrop; and a month later: There is a general expectation that you will be the successor of Mr. Winthrop in the Senate. Nothing will give the friends of freedom greater pleasure than to see you there. Dr. Bailey wrote, November 27: You certainly are the man who must take the place of the Expounder. Sumner vice Webster would be one of those rare good things which men are permitted to witness in a lifetime. John Jay wrote, December 6: I trust most sinc
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
ezuela under Pierce, died in 1867, and Sumner was pallbearer at his funeral. Just before his death, he sent to the senator a message of personal affection and of admiration for his career in the Senate. Mrs. Eames (nee Campbell), living in Washington most of the time while Sumner was in the Senate, died in 1890. He found also solace and good cheer in the congenial fellowship of men and women, distinguished for antislavery activities or sympathies, who gathered almost daily in the home of Dr. Bailey of the National Era. Hardly a foreigner of distinction ever came to Washington while Sumner was in the Senate without seeking him. At this session Jacob Bright came, commended by Harriet Martineau; Arthur h. Clough, by John Kenyon; Dr. Charles Eddy, fellow of Oxford, by Macready; but it was not till the next session that he welcomed Thackeray. Among old English friends who visited Washington in 1852 were Lord and Lady Wharncliffe, John Stuart Wortley, the second Lord Wharncliffe. ac
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. (search)
home, adhered steadily to his independent position, and counselled Wilson and other political friends to keep themselves entirely uncommitted until the field was made clear by the action of the two conventions. An account of a conference at Dr. Bailey's office in Washington, D. C., before the election of 1852, is given in the Reminiscences of the Rev. George Allen, pp. 99, 100, purporting to have been obtained by Mr. Allen from Mr. Giddings on the latter's visit to Worcester, Mass., at some time later than 1852. Conferences were probably held at Dr. Bailey's house; but Mr. Allen's report of what Sumner and others said is not authentic. Chase's inclinings were not, as stated by Mr. Allen, to General Scott, but rather to a Democratic candidate of Free Soil sympathies. He was specially anxious to keep the Free Soilers from becoming embarrassed by premature declarations in favor of a candidate whom they might find themselves unable to support without a sacrifice of their principles.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
ought he was getting better now; but his vivacity of spirit and his impatience for study are gone. It is impossible to regard him without apprehension. Seward's Life, vol. II. p. 282. When Sumner declared his purpose to make another speech before the session closed, Seward replied: If you do it, it will be the last speech you will make in this world. Sumner came to Washington, July 5, in order to go North and escape the intense heat. During the day he had many visitors, including Dr. Bailey of the National Era, Mr. Banks the Speaker, Mr. Comins, and Mr. Giddings. Mr. Giddings thus spoke of this interview in a speech July 11: Lying upon his bed, he described to me the singular sensations which occasionally gave him reason to apprehend that the brain was affected; and looking me full in the face, with great solemnity of countenance and deep emotion, he said: I sometimes am led to apprehend that I may vet be doomed to that heaviest of all afflictions.—to spend my time on eart
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
e, Mr. and Mrs. Seward, John Jay, A. G. Browne, A. B. Johnson, and E. L. Pierce; and there were occasional letters from many others. Among deaths, while he was in Europe, of friends with whom he had been more or less intimate, were those of William Jay, Oct. 14, 1858; Prescott, Jan. 28, 1859; His last letter from Sumner was written from Aix-les-Bains, Sept. 15, 1858. Horace Mann, Aug. 2, 1859; Tributes to Mr. Mann may be found in Sumner's Works, vol. IV. p. 424; vol. v. p. 288. Dr. G. Bailey of the National Era, June 5, 1859; Sumner expected to meet Dr. Bailey in Paris, but he died at sea on his way to Europe. and Tocqueville, April 16, 1859. Theodore Parker died in Florence a few months later, May 10, 1860. Sumner wrote to Parker, Aug. 22, 1859:— You will mourn Horace Mann. He has done much; but I wish he had lived to enjoy the fruits of his noble toils. He never should have left Massachusetts. His last years would have been happier and more influential had he
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
a device for evading the issue in Congress between freedom and slavery, it had been substantially adopted by Eli Thayer, the Republican member of Congress for the Worcester District, now seeking a re-election as an independent candidate against Mr. Bailey, who had been nominated by the Republicans. The contest promised to be a close one, and Sumner's speech was thought by those most intimately concerned to have insured Mr. Thayer's defeat. One journal in Boston printed an edition of twelve thousand copies for distribution in the district. Sumner received grateful notes from Mr. Bailey, and also from Mr. Dawes, who was to be his successor in the Senate. R. H. Dana, Jr., thought the speech excellent, temperate in personam, and strong in rem. On the Saturday before the election he spoke briefly at Salem for the re-election of John B. Alley to Congress; Atlas and Bee, November 6. and on the evening before the election he took the chair at Faneuil Hall, where in a brief speech he re