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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 288 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 149 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 72 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 21 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 14 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
twenty-fifth Illinois Infantry, commanding Third Brigade. No. 141Capt. James R. Griffith, Eighty-fifth Illinois Infantry. No. 142Lieut. ol. Allen L. Fahnestock, Eighty-sixth Illinois Infantry. No. 143Lieut. Col. E. Hibbard Topping, One hundred and tenth Illinois Infantry. No. 144Capt. George W. Cook, One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois Infantry. No. 145Capt. William H. Snodgrass, Twenty-second Indiana Infantry. No. 146Maj. James T. Holmes, Fifty-second Ohio Infantry. No. 147Brig. Gen. Absalom Baird, U. S. Army, commanding Third Division. No. 148Col. Moses B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Infantry, commanding First Brigade. No. 149Col. Morton C. Hunter, Eighty-second Indiana Infantry. No. 150Col. William P. Robinson, Twenty-third Missouri Infantry, of operations July 10-September 8. No. 151Lieut. Col. Ogden Street, Eleventh Ohio Infantry, of operations May 7-30. No. 152Col. Durbin Ward, Seventeenth Ohio Infantry. No. 153Lieut. Col. Frederick W. Lister, Thirty-first Ohio Infan
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
t Jonesborough about noon, orders were renewed to push the other movements on the left and center, and about 4 p. m. the reports arrived simultaneously that General Howard had thoroughly repulsed the enemy at Jonesborough; that General Schofield had reached the railroad a mile below Rough and Ready and was working up the road, breaking it as he went; that General Stanley, of General Thomas' army, had also got the road below General Schofield and was destroying it, working south, and that General Baird, of General Davis' corps, had struck it still lower down within four miles of Jonesborough. Orders were at once given for all the army to turn on Jonesborough, General Howard to keep the enemy busy while General Thomas should move down from the north, with General Schofield on his left. I also ordered the troops as they moved down to continue the thorough destruction of the railroad, because we had it then, and I did not know but that events might divert our attention. General Garrard
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
hill about half way between Kingston and Cassville. Howard's troops shelled the enemy from this position, pushing on after him to within two miles of Cassville, skirmishing with his rear guard until dark, when the command halted for the night. Baird's division, of Palmer's corps, was posted on the right of Howard's corps. Hooker's troops engaged the enemy on the road, leading direct from Adairsville to Cassville, skirmishing with him and driving him into his works at the latter place. At 1een relieved at Rome by troops from the Army of the Tennessee), was sent by General Palmer to move on Dallas by the most direct road from where he then was to support General McPherson's command, and communicate with the right of General Hooker. Baird's division, of the Fourteenth Corps, was left at Burnt Hickory to protect the trains at that point and the rear of the army. McCook's division of cavalry met the enemy's cavalry on the road leading from Burnt Hickory to Marietta near its interse
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
hereupon I directed Generals Newton and Wood to advance a strong line of skirmishers to ascertain whether this report was true. This movement was commenced at once; on Newton's front the enemy seemed taken partially by surprise and was driven from a main line of works. General Harker, perceiving the advantage gained, without waiting for orders, deployed two of his regiments to secure and hold this advanced position. I directed General Newton to move up his entire division in support. General Baird's division, of the Fourteenth Corps, came up very promptly on his left. General Wood having gained the ridge east of Mud Creek, intrenched the position, making a continuous work. General Newton's troops were in such close contact with the enemy that three men were detailed from each company in the front line to keep up a continuous fire to prevent him. from opening his artillery or musketry, which, however, in spite of this precaution, was occasionally done. As soon as it was dark New
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
ived instructions from department headquarters directing me to move early toward Jonesborough, destroying the road, and apprising me that I would probably overtake Baird's division similarly employed, and if I found Baird to report for further instructions. At daylight the corps was put in motion, Kimball's and Newton's divisions Baird to report for further instructions. At daylight the corps was put in motion, Kimball's and Newton's divisions down the railroad, Wood's division on the Rough and Ready and Griffin road in charge of the extra artillery and baggage. In starting out in the morning I passed General Schofield's headquarters. In conversation he asked me if I ranked him; I told him I did. He then said if a battle occurred he would be under my command. I said tso consider him. I had no right to command him unless so instructed from competent authority. At 10 a. m. the head of the corps arrived at the point struck by General Baird's division the day before. My chief of staff, Colonel Fullerton, was at once sent to General Thomas for instructions. At 12.15 Colonel Fullerton returned, sa
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
ded in taking the works, capturing a number of prisoners, and driving the enemy to their rear line of works. Colonel Bartleson notified me that his left was in danger, having no connection, and being enfiladed. I ordered up the remainder of the brigade, sending Captain Tinney, assistant adjutant-general, with the Fortieth Indiana Volunteers to the left of the line, asked and obtained a regiment, the Third Kentucky Volunteers, from General Harker, which made the connection complete with General Baird. My entire line was within easy musket-range of the enemy, who kept up a heavy and incessant fire upon us from artillery and infantry when we would slacken our fire sufficient for them to look over their works. It was, therefore, necessary for our own safety to keep up a constant fire, and thus keep the enemy down in their works, and away from their artillery. In this charge my brigade sustained a loss of 1 commissioned officer and 13 enlisted men killed, and 8 commissioned officers a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
y having evacuated the position at New Hope, we moved on the 6th to within two miles of Acworth and camped, remaining until the morning of the 10th, when the brigade moved with the division in the direction of Lost Mountain, and after halting through the afternoon, formed on the right of the Fourteenth Corps and fortified. The Twenty-second Illinois Infantry left for the rear to-day to be mustered out of service. On the 11th instant we moved two miles to the left and formed on the right of Baird's division, Fourteenth Corps, and fortified, and the 12th, 13th, and 14th were passed in skirmishing. On the 15th we marched at 8 a. m., and halted some hours near Pine Mountain. At 2 p. m. formed with the division in column of attack, expecting to assault the enemy's works, some distance in front. I was ordered by General Newton to form a strong skirmish line, advance, and develop the enemy's line. The Forty-second Illinois Infantry and Fifty-first Illinois Infantry were put on the skir
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
ng on Kenesaw Mountain, his center on Pine Mountain, and his left on Lost Mountain, his line thus formed running nearly due east and west, fronting north. This brigade, being in support of other troops, did not become engaged until near Pine Mountain, on the 14th, where, having taken position the night previous (being formed in two lines, the right connecting with General Wagner's brigade, of General Newton's division, of the Fourth Corps, and on the left with Colonel Este's brigade, of General Baird's division, of the Fourteenth Corps), with the Thirty-second Indiana Infantry covering our front as skirmishers, the brigade moved forward about 9 a. m., gradually obliquing to the left to keep our connection with Colonel Este's brigade. The enemy stubbornly resisted our advance, but we steadily pressed him back about three-fourths of a mile, where, striking his first line of works on Pine Mountain, we halted within 300 yards of the same and strongly intrenched the position thus obtaine
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 62 (search)
On the morning of the 6th we marched to, and went into camp near, Acworth, Ga. We remained here quietly in camp on the 7th, 8th, and 9th. On the latter day Colonel Wallace left the command, on a leave of absence, and turned it over to me. The 10th, 11th, 12th, and 13th we spent in camp, and in moving into position, confronted the position of the enemy at Kenesaw and Pine Mountains. On the 14th we were on the left of the first line of the brigade, our left connecting with the right of General Baird's division, of the Fourteenth Corps. We advanced during the day about half a mile from the position we occupied in the morning, a-d in the afternoon were ordered to relieve the skirmishers of the Thirty-second Indiana, covering the front of the brigade, which I did with Company A, Lieutenant Hanson. Our skirmishers drove the skirmishers of the enemy into a line of rail barricades directly in front of their main line of works, with a loss to us of Lieutenant Hadden, Company A, killed,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 92 (search)
, 1864. General: The Fourteenth Corps gained decided advantage to-day. The charge of my old division, under King, against the enemy's works was a gallant affair; in fact, the operations of the entire corps are highly satisfactory. A portion of King's men were actually in the enemy's works, but in consequence of the entanglements few men could reach them and not in sufficient force to hold them. The lines are advanced. King is intrenched beyond the rebel skirmish line of this morning. Baird's line is in advance of its position this morning. The position of Morgan was fully explained this evening. We have lost not far from 500 men, while we have captured about 350 or 400 prisoners. R. W. Johnson, Brigadier-General. [Major-General Schofield.] Addenda: report of casualties in Fourteenth Army Corps during operations of August 11, 1864. Zzz R. W. Johnson, Brigadier-General, Commanding. headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 12, 1864.
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