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I came out in the yard and asked Mr. Patterson what was the matter. He said somebody was stealing the geese. Did not see the man till he got out of the yard. Came back to the house, put on my clothes, and went with Mr. Patterson to see if deceased was much hurt. On getting near the spot a large black dog prevented us from getting nearer. When I first saw the man he was twenty or thirty yards beyond the fence. There was but one report of a pistol.----I board with Mr. Patterson. Alfred Baker deposed: I am twelve years old. I know the man who was shot. His name is Dick McMullen. He was a volunteer in Wise's Mounted Guard--Captain Hawley. I live on 17th street.--My mother keeps an eating-house near John Dwyer's. McMullen came to her house sometimes. The jury rendered a verdict that deceased came to his death by a pistol fired by Robert Patterson. Patterson was arrested about 1 o'clock by Officers Seal and Perrin, and being carried before the Mayor, was by that function
e Mayor's consideration: John Dollan, charged with robbing Thomas D. Marlow of thirty two and a half pounds of pork, valued at $195. Case partially investigated and then continued till this morning for further testimony. Three white females, named Sarah Ann Leverman, Malinda Brown, and Octavia Durell, charged with being persons of evil fame, were remanded to prison for want of security to keep the peace and be of good behavior for twelve months. Augustus Field, John Egerton, and Alfred Baker, arrested on the charge of being persons of evil fame, and deserters from the Confederate service, were ordered to report forthwith to the Provost Marshal. James Edwards, James Doyle, Thomas Emory, and Robert, Hite, were charged with stealing two trunks, containing a valuable assortment of wearing apparel, the property of Mrs. Mary Johnson. The testimony for the Commonwealth was of such a character as to determine the Mayor to remand Edwards, Emory, and Hite, for further examination
aside. In this report I have been compelled to enter into many details, and to make some animated versions upon the conduct of General Pemberton. The one was no pleasant task — the other a most painful duty; both have been forced upon me by the official report of Gen. Pemberton, made to the War Department instead of to me, to whom it was due. General Pemberton, by direct assertion and by implication, puts upon me the responsibility of the movement which led his army to defeat at Baker's creek and Big Black bridge — defeats which produced the loss of Vicksburg and its army. This statement has been circulated by the press, in more or less detail, and with more or less marks of an official character, until my silence would be almost an acknowledgment of the justice of the charge. A proper regard for the good opinion of my Government has compelled me, therefore, to throw aside that delicacy which I would gladly have observed towards a brother officer, suffering much
A Christmas Frolic: --Alfred Baker, a young man with one eye, was charged with making an assault upon a policeman. Baker said he was drunk and hit the policeman, but did not hurt him. He thought it no crime to get drunk on Christmas day. Being his first appearance, the Mayor discharged him. A Christmas Frolic: --Alfred Baker, a young man with one eye, was charged with making an assault upon a policeman. Baker said he was drunk and hit the policeman, but did not hurt him. He thought it no crime to get drunk on Christmas day. Being his first appearance, the Mayor discharged him.