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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4., Reminiscences of an earlier Medford. (search)
s four smoking horses, roll up to the steps of the Medford House! The proprietorship of the Medford House has passed through many hands, but of no one of the landlords will people who are old enough retain a more vivid recollection than of Augustus Baker. He was an Italian by birth, and a barber by profession. I could never understand where he got his English name, but he had probably adopted it. Entirely without education, he was gifted with native shrewdness, and at one time became possesne of his apple trees overhung the fence of a neighboring proprietor who, being a very close man, was jealous of the encroachment, and availing himself of what he believed to be his legal rights, cut off the limbs of the tree close to the fence. Baker said nothing, but one day going into his orchard he saw that his neighbor, working in his own field, had thrown his coat upon the fence. The vengeful Italian, creeping up stealthily, took out his knife and cut off that portion of the garment whi
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. (search)
their horses were being refreshed by the roadside. The building was rebuilt after the fire and stands today very much like the original in general outline. Mr. Barker later removed to High street, just east of the old Orthodox Church. In the rear of the Wait and Barker buildings were the dwelling and wheelwright shop of Elias Tufts, entered from a passageway now called Tufts place. His father had a large pottery there many years ago. In the building just south of Tufts place, Mrs. Augustus Baker, afterward the landlady at the Medford House, had a variety store in 1830. About 1840, Mr. James Hyde bought the place and opened an oyster house. The land is now owned by his family. He dug a well on the street line and furnished a watering trough. This was probably the first one in town set at the street curb for public use. Mr. Hyde had a dispute with the town about the street line, and every few years would fence off a portion of the roadway. He finally received payment for w
ham, or Medford coach reined up to the door, the neighborhood was aware of it. It was a busy place in a busy town, and well patronized by the citizens and travelling public. The best-known and most popular landlords were James Bride and Augustus Baker. Directly opposite the hotel, on the site of the present police station, was the home of Nathan Wait, blacksmith. His buildings extended on Short street (Swan) to Union street, and his premises, on Union and Main street to the Sparrell esthere and Royall street where canal boats tied up to unload. On the south bank of the canal was the Columbian Hotel, which in its day had been a fine dwelling house. This hostelry, as well as the Medford House, was kept by James Bride and Augustus Baker. In the Royall House lived Mrs. Ruth Tidd, a sister of William Dawes, who on April 18, 1775, rode out by way of Roxbury to warn the Middlesex farmers of danger. She was about the only person in Medford who indulged in a coach and pair of
for the keeping of a temperance house failed, and in the year 1845 the estate was sold to Mr. Augustus Baker, who kept the house for many years. He was succeeded by Messrs. A. J. Emerson, Peter A. Gl street, stood a house called the Columbia House. It was first kept as a public house by Mr. Augustus Baker, who afterwards was landlord of the Medford House. At the time Mr. Baker purchased theBaker purchased the Medford House, Mr. James Bride was its landlord. When Mr. Baker took possession of that house, Mr. Bride removed to the Columbia House, vacated by Mr. Baker. The Columbia House was afterwards useMr. Baker took possession of that house, Mr. Bride removed to the Columbia House, vacated by Mr. Baker. The Columbia House was afterwards used as a private dwelling. A few years ago it was removed to a court, leading from Mystic avenue, and after being cut into two parts, was remodeled, and these are now used as tenement houses. SimpsMr. Baker. The Columbia House was afterwards used as a private dwelling. A few years ago it was removed to a court, leading from Mystic avenue, and after being cut into two parts, was remodeled, and these are now used as tenement houses. Simpsons Hotel. The brick house standing on the north side of High street was built in the year 1756, by Mr. Thomas Seccomb, upon land purchased by Mr. Seccomb of Philip Carteret, the deed being dated
her daughters Nabby and Pamelia kept a dame school for many years in the house on the north side of High street. It used to be sheltered from the street by large lilac bushes which grew on the slope between the sidewalk and the roadway. A face wall has been built and the sidewalk lowered, which adds to the comfort of the pedestrian and detracts from the picturesqueness of the house. Next below was the old Putnam tavern, and beyond, the home of Minot Richardson, whose daughter married Augustus Baker, the proprietor of the Medford House. This house stood on the edge of the roadway, but has been moved back. John Wade owned the house where Mr. George H. Bean the florist lives now. Major Wade's tannery was just east of this house, and family tradition says that he built the last named dwelling and two others opposite for his operatives. Mr. A. D. Puffer's mansion, remodelled and moved back from the street, was the home of Major Samuel Swan and his son Joseph. This house was orig
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 23., The Touro house and its owner. (search)
side Railroad station and towards, but not including, some of the campus of Tufts College. In his day he little dreamed of the vision of Mr. Tufts putting a light upon the bleak pasture lands of Walnut Hill. Oliver Wiswall. Rev. Anson Titus. To this we will add that the Medford turnpike and Middlesex canal paid dividends for a time. As to Mr. Touro's shipyard or vessels he had built in Medford—we fail to find even the slightest mention of any such in that long list compiled by Rev. Augustus Baker in 1846. Yet, Mr. Touro, with his wealth, may have been a silent partner in that great Medford business of a century ago. As said above, his name is preserved, and is in daily use in Medford in Touro avenue, but we know of no relic of his old home other than the iron fireback taken from the chimney and given to the Royall House Association. Abraham Touro was the son of Rev. Isaac Touro, and had a brother Judah, who was seriously wounded on the field of Chalmette, in the battle w