hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., With the cavalry on the Peninsula. (search)
ulars, struck cavalry, infantry, batteries, redoubts, and ravines, and pushed their attack with audacity. Cavalrymen galloped around field-works. We soon heard of the gallantry of Colonel Grier, Major Lawrence Williams, Captains Sanders, Davis, Baker, and others in cavalry charges, and that the French Princes were among the first in the advance. Lieutenant-Colonel Grier, commanding the 1st ( Old Billy Grier, the bucno commandante ), had led a charge and engaged two of the enemy in personal cPennsylvania, were let loose upon the enemy, and over 60 of his officers and men were left on the ground, whilst the survivors fled in great disorder toward Richmond. The command was the 1st North Carolina and 3d Virginia Cavalry, led by Colonel Lawrence Baker, a comrade of mine in the old army. The 3d Pennsylvania lost 1 man killed and 5 wounded. After this affair I galloped back to see General McClellan, and found him near a house south of White Oak Swamp Bridge. Near him were groups of
wrence S. Baker Brigadier-General Lawrence S. Baker, distinguished as a cavalry officer in the service of the Confederate States, was born in Gates county, N. C., in May, 1830. His family is an old and honorable one, founded in America by Lawrence Baker, who came to Virginia from England early in the seventeenth century and became a member of the house of burgesses. His descendant, Gen. Lawrence Baker, of North Carolina, was a leader in the movement for independence, served in the RevolutioGen. Lawrence Baker, of North Carolina, was a leader in the movement for independence, served in the Revolutionary war, and was one of the two representatives of North Carolina in the Continental Congress. His son, John B. Baker, M. D., father of Gen. L. S. Baker, was a wellknown physician and prominent citizen of North Carolina, in the legislature of which he sat as a member from Gates county. General Baker received his early education in his native State and at Norfolk academy, and then entered the United States military academy at West Point, where he was graduated in the class of 1851. At his gra