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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Very complete roll [from the Richmond, A., Dispatch, September 16th, 1900.] (search)
H.—Transferred to Rosser's Cavalry, 1862. Died since the war. Bowman, Joseph—Transferred from Company C, 10th Virginia Infantry, 1862. Barton, Isaac O.—Transferred from Company C, 10th Virginia Infantry, 1862. Resides at Edinburg, Va. Baker, Joseph—Teamster. Resides at Fisher's Hill; Va. Baker, Abraham—Transferred from Imboden's Cavalry. Resides near Edinburg. Boyer, William M.—Transferred? Brannon, Jack—Transferred from Company C, 10th Virginia Infantry, 1862, and missinBaker, Abraham—Transferred from Imboden's Cavalry. Resides near Edinburg. Boyer, William M.—Transferred? Brannon, Jack—Transferred from Company C, 10th Virginia Infantry, 1862, and missing, Wilderness, 1864. Bragonier, D. H.—Transferred from Company C, 10th Virginia Infantry, 1862. Resides in Winchester, Va. Bragonier, Robert C.-Transferred from Company C, 10th Virginia Infantry. Lives at Luray, Va. Clinedinst, James A.—Captured near Woodstock, October, 1863. Prisoner at Camp Chase and Fort Delaware twenty-two months. Resides at Moorefield, W. Va. Clinedinst, John W.—Captured near Woodstock, Va., October, 1863. Prisoner at Camp Chase and Fort
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How Lieut. Walter Bowie of Mosby's command met his end. [from the Richmond, Va., Times, June 23, 1900. (search)
er Bowie of Mosby's command met his end. [from the Richmond, Va., Times, June 23, 1900. In the McClure Magazine for December, 1898, an account of the death of Lieutenant Walter Bowie, of Mosby's Command, appears over the signature of Roy Stannard Baker, in which he cleverly shows how Detective Trail secured the Lieutenant's shot-gun from his home in Prince George county, Maryland, and with it followed him and his two comrades while scouting in Maryland during the war between the States, apty gun! How strange to those who know differently. I read this story with interest, because of the novel sense shown in it, yet with no little astonishment, on account of the vast amount of ingenuity displayed in its make-up. To be frank, Mr. Baker so disfigured the circumstances that attended Walter Bowie's death that those who were with him at the time of its occurence fail to recognize them. Distorted history, especially war history, is so distasteful to me that if I be pardoned for t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard. (search)
nes east of the pike—another line of slighter profile branched off in a curve still more to the southwest, forming an advanced line, with its left running into Fort Stephens, and its right resting in air near the railroad. It was this last line that Hoke abandoned on the night of May 13th and 14th. At 3 o'clock in the morning of the 14th General Beauregard arrived at Drewry's by a circuitous route from Petersburg, bringing with him two regiments—about 1,200 men—of Colquitt's Brigade, and Baker's Regiment of Cavalry. Before assuming command or seeing General Hoke, who expecting another attack from Butler, was then engaged along his lines, he met and held a conference with Colonels Harris and Stephens, of the engineers. They acquainted him with the exact state of affairs in our front, and also gave him a succinct account of the last engagements up to the 12th, between Grant and Lee, with the then position of those armies. Instantly devising a scheme for the co-operative action o<