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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 14 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.13 (search)
th him until the middle of August, well-fed and cared for, and when I left him he insisted on driving me to Hagerstown, and paying my railway fare to Baltimore, via Harrisburg. Stanley remembered, afterwards, that the farm-house belonged to a Mr. Baker, and that, in June, 1862, he had walked there from Harper's Ferry--three miles from Sharpsburg, and nine miles from Hagerstown. Mr. Baker's house seemed to have been near the cross-roads — near the extreme left flank of McClellan's army.--D. im until the middle of August, well-fed and cared for, and when I left him he insisted on driving me to Hagerstown, and paying my railway fare to Baltimore, via Harrisburg. Stanley remembered, afterwards, that the farm-house belonged to a Mr. Baker, and that, in June, 1862, he had walked there from Harper's Ferry--three miles from Sharpsburg, and nine miles from Hagerstown. Mr. Baker's house seemed to have been near the cross-roads — near the extreme left flank of McClellan's army.--D.
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.16 (search)
A telegram called him to Paris, to meet Mr. Bennett in person; and there, October 16, 1869, he received a commission of startling proportions. He was to search for Livingstone in earnest,--not for an interview, but to discover, and, if necessary, extricate him, wherever he might be in the heart of Africa. But this was to be only the climax of a series of preliminary expeditions. Briefly, these consisted of a report of the opening of the Suez Canal; some observations of Upper Egypt, and Baker's expedition; the underground explorations in Jerusalem; Syrian politics; Turkish politics at Stamboul; archaeological explorations in the Crimea; politics and progress in the Caucasus; projects of Russia in that region; Trans-Caspian affairs; Persian politics, geography, and present conditions; a glance at India; and, finally,--a search for Livingstone in Equatorial Africa! Into this many-branched search for knowledge Stanley now threw himself. He carried out the whole programme, up to
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.17 (search)
sent in the western country; and that he had only arrived either the same day they had left Ujiji with their caravan, or the day before. To my mind, startling as it was to me, it appeared that he could be no other than Livingstone. True, Sir Samuel Baker was known to be in Central Africa in the neighbourhood of the Nile lakes — but he was not grey-bearded; a traveller might have arrived from the West Coast,--he might be a Portuguese, a German, or a Frenchman,--but then none of these had ever fact that I am becoming steeped in Livingstonian ideas upon everything that is African, from pity for the big-stomached picaninny, clinging to the waist-strings of its mother, to the missionary bishop, and the great explorers, Burton, Speke, and Baker. He is a strong man in every way, with an individual tenacity of character. His memory is retentive. How he can remember Whittier's poems, couplets out of which I hear frequently, as well as from Longfellow, I cannot make out. I do not think
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.19 (search)
Lake Tanganyika, being a sweet-water lake, must naturally possess an outlet somewhere. It has not been circumnavigated and is therefore unexplored. I will settle that problem also. Then I may be able to throw some light on Lake Albert. Sir Samuel Baker voyaged along some sixty miles of its northeastern shore, but he said it was illimitable to the south-west. To know the extent of that lake would be worth some trouble. Surely, if I can resolve any of these, which such travellers as Dr. Livingstone, Captains Burton, Speke, and Grant, and Sir Samuel Baker left unsettled, people must needs believe that I discovered Livingstone! A little while after the burial For a full account of the funeral obsequies, see the Memoir prefacing Stanley's book, How I Found Livingstone. of Livingstone at Westminster, I strolled over to the office of the Daily telegraph, and pointed out to the proprietors how much remained shrouded in mystery in Dark Africa. The proprietor asked, But do you t
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.21 (search)
e place whence I looked upon the Semliki Valley, rose an enormous range of mountains, whose summits and slopes, for about three thousand feet, were covered with perpetual snow. As the snow-line near the Equator is found at a little over fifteen thousand feet, I may then safely estimate the height of these mountains to be between eighteen thousand and nineteen thousand feet above the level of the sea. The singular thing about these mountains is that so many white travellers--Sir Samuel and Lady Baker, Gessi Pasha, Mason Bey, Emin Pasha, and Captain Casati--should have been within observing distance and never had an opportunity to view them. There were also a thousand of our expedition who were for seventy-two days, or thereabouts, within easy visual distance of the phenomenon, but not one man saw it until suddenly it issued out from the obscurity, its great peaks islanded in an atmosphere of beautiful translucence. And, for three days in succession, the wonderful mountains stood al
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.22 (search)
ped to fill in the blank in the atlas of 1849, which has become the network of names in the atlas of 1904. A famous company of strong men gave the best of their energies to the opening of Africa during the nineteenth century. They were missionaries, like Moffat and Livingstone; scientific inquirers, like Barth, Rohlfs, Du Chaillu, Teleki, and Thomson; adventurous explorers, like Speke, Grant, Burton, Cameron, and Selous; and soldiers, statesmen, and organisers, such as Gordon, Rhodes, Samuel Baker, Emin Pasha, Johnston, Lugard, and Taubman Goldie — but there is no need to go through the list. Their discoveries were made often with a more slender equipment and scantier resources; as administrators, one or two at least could be counted his equals. But those of the distinguished band, who still survive, would freely acknowledge that it was Stanley who put the crown and coping-stone on the edifice of African exploration, and so completed the task, begun twenty-four centuries ago with
36.-officers of the N. J. Troops. First Regiment.--Col. Commanding, A. J. Johnson; Lieut. Col., James Peckell; Major, Wm. I. Mikels; Adjutant, Joseph Trawin; Quartermaster, T. F. Ketchum. Captains--Company A, John Britzinghoffer. Company B, W. S. Tibson. Company C, Thos. Q. Martin. Company D, H. O. Beach. Company E, W. B. Provost. Company F, H. Bowden. Company G, H. F. Stanford. Company H, Wm. Reynolds. Company I, John. H. Higginson. Company K, C. W. Johnson. Second Regiment.--Colonel, Baker; Lieut.-Col., Speer; Surgeon, Quidour; Assistant do., Longstaff; Quartermaster, Drinkerhoff; Quartermaster's Sergeant, Hill; Adjutant, Van Rippen. Company A, Capt. Van Rippen. Company B, Capt. Hoffer. Company C, Capt. Grain. Company D, Capt. Lillendhal. Company E, Capt. Van Buskirk. Company F, Capt. Tonnelle. Company G, Capt. Ramsay. Company H, (Zouaves,) Capt. Babcock. Company I, Capt. Van Vorhees. Company K, Captain Dunning. Third Regiment.--Wm. Napton, Colonel; Stephen Moore, Lieutenan
mpson, Wood, and Speaker Stovall. Nays.--Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Nash, Richardson, and Stokes. Absent and not voting--Messrs. Bumpass, Mickley, Newman, Stokely, and Trimble. The following is the vote in the House: Yeas.--Messrs. Baker of Perry, Baker of Weakley, Bayless, Bicknell, Bledsoe, Cheatham, Cowden, Davidson, Davis, Dudley, Ewing, Farley, Farrelly, Ford, Frazie, Gantt, Guy, Havron, Hart, Ingram, Jones, Kenner, Kennedy, Lea, Lockhart, Martin, Mayfield, McCabe, MorphBaker of Weakley, Bayless, Bicknell, Bledsoe, Cheatham, Cowden, Davidson, Davis, Dudley, Ewing, Farley, Farrelly, Ford, Frazie, Gantt, Guy, Havron, Hart, Ingram, Jones, Kenner, Kennedy, Lea, Lockhart, Martin, Mayfield, McCabe, Morphies, Nail, Hickett, Porter, Richardson, Roberts, Shield, Smith, Sewel, Trevitt, Vaughn, Whitmore, Woods, and Speaker Whitthorne. Nays.--Messrs. Armstrong, Brazelton, Butler, Caldwell, Gorman, Greene, Morris, Norman, Russell, Senter, Strewsbury, White of Davidson, Williams of Knox, Wisener, and Woodard. Absent and not voting--Messrs. Barksdale, Beaty, Bennett, Britton, Critz, Doak, East, Gillespie, Harris, Hebb, Johnson, Kincaid of Anderson, Kincaid of. Claiborne, Trewhitt, White of Dickso
Rev. George C. Baldwin, D. D., opened the proceedings with prayer, after which The Committee, appointed at a preliminary meeting--Rev. Dr. Wm. R. Williams, N. Y.; Rev. Dr. Rufus Babcock, N. J.; Rev. Dr. E. E. Cummings, New Hampshire; Rev. Dr. S. Baker; Rev. J. H. Smith, of Penn.; Rev. Dr. W. H. Shailer, Me.; Rev. Dr. S. B. Swain, Mass.,--presented, through the Chairman, Rev. Dr. Williams, the following report: The Assembly of Baptists gathered from the various Northern States of the Und, in the strength of the Lord God of our fathers, shall hope to contest, through this generation if need be, the feasibility of the transfer. William R. Williams, N. Y. Rufus Babcock, Jr., N. J. E. E. Cummings, N. H. J. Hyatt Smith, Pa. Samuel Baker, N. Y. S. B. Swain, Mass. Rev. Dr. Welch supposed it was intended to adopt the report without debate. He would, however, ask the privilege of speaking a few words on the question before the meeting. With all his heart he subscribed to
ptured vessel followed the Perry to Charleston Bar, where they met the Minnesota on Thursday, at 4 P. M. Here the prisoners were transferred to the Minnesota, and the schooner was handed over to her commander. On Friday night, Midshipman McCook, with a crew from the same vessel, was ordered to carry the schooner to New York. One of the parties on board the Savannah is a young man hailing from New York, who represents that he was impressed on board of the privateer while unconscious. He had been two months in the hospital in Charleston, and from appearances he is very much broken down in health, and the last man who would adopt privateering as a profession. He states that the name of the captain of the schooner was Baker, and that he had been in the Chilian navy. The other officers were a Commissary, Lieutenant, Prize-Master, and Navigator, whose names he did not know. He refuses to give his own name, but says he is a Northern man with Northern sentiments.--N. Y. Times, June 16.
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