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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
n that great occasion, that no such offer in any form was made. The Nashville American newspaper, of the 26th of June, 1897, published a communication from Mr. R. H. Baker, of Watertown, Tenn., under the head lines, Judge Reagan in Error, in which he took issue with me on that question, thereby necessarily assuming that President Lincoln had made such an offer. The day on which Mr. Baker's article was published I sent a note to the American, stating that on my return home I would send to that paper a statement of the authorities on which I made the denial that any such offer had been made. Pursuant to that promise, on the 7th day of July, 1897, I se. Lincoln did, it is difficult to understand just why Judge Reagan should be so inconsistent. Let us see as to this. My letter of July 7th was a reply to Mr. R. H. Baker, who questioned the truthfulness of my denial that such an offer was made. It is also true that a considerable portion of the people of the Southern States h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
proche, he fell at the zenith of his glory, September, 1863. Though General G. J. Wright was as brave and gallant as man could be, yet they all were older; we expected much of them. It was not the same feeling we had for Pierce Young. As Colonel Baker, of the 1st North Carolina Cavalry, told him at Middletown, Maryland, September 12, 1862, where, after a hard day's fight, incensed at some slighting remark that Baker had made of a charge of The Cobb Legion, he defied him to mortal combat thBaker had made of a charge of The Cobb Legion, he defied him to mortal combat then and there, on horseback or on foot, with sabre or pistol, or any way he would fight. Why, Pierce, you are nothing but a boy, you forget yourself; I came here to fight Yankees, not as good a soldier as you. Unmindful of the emphatic berating of his junior officer, conscious of his own courage, demonstrated in many a fierce encounter, instead of arresting him for disrespect, he laughed at the boyishness displayed even before his own regiment, who, with the older men of Young's Regiment, alwa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Drewry's Bluff. (search)
ders) on or about the 14th May, ‘64. Finding that General Pickett was very ill from fever, I ordered Genl. Whiting, then at Wilmington, to come at once to Petersburg to assume command, while I moved to Drury's Bluff, where General Hoke temporarily commanded. General W. arrived at about noon on the 13th, & after about one hour's conference with him & leaving with him some written general instructions, I started for Drury's Bluff accompanied by 3 regiments of Colquitt's brigade & part of Col. Baker's Regiment of Cavalry. When we arrived at Swift Creek I was informed by one of my aids just returning from Richmond that he had met some of Butler's Federal troops on their way to attack Drury's Bluff. I therefore diverged to Chesterfield C. H., where we arrived about 12 h. P. M., & found it occupied by a small force of Federals which we drove out of the place. We reached D's Bluff about 3 h. A. M., in a terrible rainstorm, passing between Butler's left & the river. I at once sent fo