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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for G. B. Balch or search for G. B. Balch in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
nnoissance so far as to form. an approximate estimate of the force on Tybee Island, and of the possibility of gaining access to the inner bar; and further, if the information acquired by this reconnoissance should be important, to return and communicate it to me immediately. I was not surprised when he came back and reported that the defences on Tybee Island had probably been abandoned. Deeming it proper, however, to add the Seneca, Lieutenant Commanding Ammen, and Pocahontas, Lieutenant-Commander Balch, to his force, I directed him to renew his approaches with caution, and, if no opposition was met with, to occupy the channel. I am happy now to have it in my power to inform the Department that the Flag, the Augusta, and the Pocahontas, are at anchor in the harbor abreast of Tybee beacon and light, and that the Savannah has been ordered to take the same position. The abandonment of Tybee Island, on which there is a strong Martello tower, with a battery at its base, is due to
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
nnoissance so far as to form. an approximate estimate of the force on Tybee Island, and of the possibility of gaining access to the inner bar; and further, if the information acquired by this reconnoissance should be important, to return and communicate it to me immediately. I was not surprised when he came back and reported that the defences on Tybee Island had probably been abandoned. Deeming it proper, however, to add the Seneca, Lieutenant Commanding Ammen, and Pocahontas, Lieutenant-Commander Balch, to his force, I directed him to renew his approaches with caution, and, if no opposition was met with, to occupy the channel. I am happy now to have it in my power to inform the Department that the Flag, the Augusta, and the Pocahontas, are at anchor in the harbor abreast of Tybee beacon and light, and that the Savannah has been ordered to take the same position. The abandonment of Tybee Island, on which there is a strong Martello tower, with a battery at its base, is due to
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
ioned in this report. During the action, the Pawnee took an enfilading position in the Keowah River, while the Williams was ordered to work up towards Legareville. The three vessels kept up such a fire that the enemy fled precipitately. Commander Balch speaks in the highest terms of Lieutenant-Commander Meade's coolness and bravery, the management of his vessel, and the remarkable rapidity of his fire. On the conclusion of the firing, General Gordon, commanding the troops at the south ehe different vessels, which ought not to have been the case where all did so well. In addition to Lieutenant Commander Meade's gallantry in the action, he made a reconnoissance of the ground abandoned by the enemy, and then, by direction of Commander Balch, headed an expedition to bring off the guns which General Gordon had failed to take possession of. His force consisted of 3 boats, 3 officers, and 50 Captain (now Rear-Admiral) George B. Balch. men from the Pawnee; 4 boats, 4 officers and
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
stance. It was decided to form a naval brigade, to be furnished with two field-howitzer batteries of four guns each. All the forces that could be spared from the vessels on blockade were withdrawn, and the night of November 28th was appointed for proceeding up the Broad River and into Boyd's Creek, one of its branches, whence a short march only was necessary to reach the railroad connecting Savannah with Charleston. The vessels of the Navy selected for this service were the Pawnee, Commander Balch; Mingoe, Commander Creighton; Pontiac, Lieutenant-Commander Luce; Winona, Lieutenant-Commander Dana; Wissahickon, Lieutenant-Commander McGlensey; Sonoma, Lieutenant-Commander Scott; all carrying heavy guns. There were four half-companies of welldrilled seamen under Lieutenant James O'Kane; Lieutenant-Commander E. O. Mathews commanded the Navy artillery, and the marines from the different vessels were under the command of First-Lieutenant George G. Stoddard. After a harassing progres