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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of Congress to the people of the Confederate States: joint resolution in relation to the war. (search)
D. Holder, Dan. W. Lewis, Henry E. Read, A. T. Davidson, M. H. Macwillie, James Lyons, Caspar W. Bell, R. B. Hilton, Charles J. Villere, J. W. Moore, Lucius J. Dupre, John D. C. Atkins, Israel Welsh, William G. Swan, F. B. Sexton, T. L. Burnett, George G. Vest, Wm. Porcher Miles, E. Barksdale, Charles F. Collier, P. W. Gray, W. W. Clarke, William W. Boyce, John R. Chambliss, John J. McRae, John Perkins, Jr., Robert Johnson, James Farrow, W. D. Simpson, Lucius J. Gartrell, M. D. Graham, John B. Baldwin, E. M. Bruce, Thomas B. Hanly, W. P. Chilton, O. R. Kenan, C. M. Conrad, H. W. Bruce, David Clopton, W. B. Machen, D. C. DeJarnette, H. C. Chambers, Thomas Menees, S. A. Miller, James M. Baker, Robert W. Barnwell, A. G. Brown, Henry C. Burnett, Allen T. Caperton, John B. Clark, Clement C. Clay, William T. Dortch, Landon C. Haynes, Gustavus A. Henry, Benjamin H. Hill, R. M. T. Hunter, Robert Jemison, Jr.; Herschel V. Johnson, of Georgia; Robert W. Johnson, of Arkansas; Waldo P. Johnson,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
oy at Winchester at 60,000, and General Lee's entire force at Gettysburg at 107,000 men. Now the truth is that these figures are most inexcusable exaggerations. General Lee's entire force at Gettysburg was not quite 57,000 men. Ah! if our grand old chieftan had commanded the numbers which Northern generals and Northern writers attribute to him, then the story of Gettysburg and of the war would have been far different. Sherman's Historical raid. By H. V. Boynton. Cincinnati: Wilstach, Baldwin & Co. The author has kindly sent us a copy of this able and scathing review of Sherman's Memoirs, and we have read it with very great interest. He shows most conclusively from the official records that Sherman has done great injustice to Grant, Buell, Rosecrans, Thomas, McPherson, Schofield, and almost every other officer to whom he alludes in his book, and he carries the war into Africa by severely criticising Sherman's generalship, upon some of his most important fields, and showin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of a narrative received of Colonel John B. Baldwin, of Staunton, touching the Origin of the war. (search)
of losing a part by the lamented death of Colonel Baldwin. What I here attempt to do, is to give fting as usher, or porter, was directed by Colonel Baldwin's companion, to inform the President thatstate of opinion and purpose there. Upon Colonel Baldwin's portraying the sentiments which prevaile all this? turning almost fiercely upon Colonel Baldwin. He replied: Why, Mr. President, you didry, in a proclamation of five lines, said Colonel Baldwin, and we pledge ourselves that Virginia (aington. In a letter to me, he says: When Colonel Baldwin returned to Richmond, he reported to the the last four days; and the very men whom Colonel Baldwin found in conclave with him were probably cede. And above all, the policy urged by Colonel Baldwin would have disappointed the hopes of legiroclamation. The other confirmation of Colonel Baldwin's hypothesis was presented a few weeks afgle objection, both to the wise advice of Colonel Baldwin and Mr. Stuart, was: Then what would beco[35 more...]
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 2: Introductory Sketches. (search)
on has since been often pressed home upon me whether, after all, the Democrats of Virginia did not, in this great crisis, exhibit a higher degree of prescient statesmanship. Among the Whig leaders I distinctly recall William Ballard Preston, A. H. H. Stuart, Thomas Stanhope Flournoy, and John Minor Botts. I do not remember whether John B. Baldwin was a member of this convention of 1860. If so, I did not happen to hear him speak. Mr. Preston, Mr. Stuart, and Mr. Flournoy, as well as Mr. Baldwin, were, later, members of the Secession Convention of Virginia, but all were Union men up to President Lincoln's call for troops. Mr. Preston and Mr. Stuart were not only finished orators, but statesmen of ability and experience. Both had graced the Legislature of their State and the Congress of the United States, and both had been members of the Federal Cabinet --Mr. Preston during General Taylor's and Mr. Stuart during Mr. Fillmore's administration. Mr. Preston was afterwards a membe
C. J. Munnerlyn, Thomas S. Ashe, O. R. Singleton, J. L. Pugh, A. H. Arrington, Walter R. Staples, A. R. Boteler, Thomas J. Foster, W. R. Smith, Robert J. Breckinridge, John M. Martin, Porter Ingram, A. A. Garland, E. S. Dargan, D. Funsten, Thomas D. McDowell, J. R. McLean, R. R. Bridges, G. W. Jones, B. S. Gaither, George W. Ewing, W. D. Holder, Daniel W. Lewis, Henry E. Read, A. J. Davidson, M. H. Macwillie, James Lyons, Caspar W. Bell, R. B. Hilton, Charles J. Villers, J. W. Moore, Lucien J. Dupre, John C. Atkins, Israel Welsh, William G. Swan, F. B. Sexton, T. L. Burnett, George G. Vest, William Porcher Miles, E. Barksdale, Charles F. Collier, P. W. Gray, W. W. Clarke, William W. Boyce, John R. Chambliss, John J. McRae, John Perkins, Jr., Robert Johnston, James Farrow, W. D. Simpson, Lucius J. Gartrell, M. D. Graham, John B. Baldwin, E. M. Bruce, Thomas B. Hanly, W. P. Chilton, A. H. Kenan, C. M. Conrad, H. M. Bruce, David Clopton, W. B. Machen, D. C. De Jarnette, H. C. Chambers.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 87.-the campaign in Florida. (search)
e also driven in. To-night our troops are making preparations to march forward toward Baldwin at daylight to-morrow. Baldwin is a small town on the Florida Central Railroad, and eighteen miles distant from here. General Seymour has already esaken at Ten-Mile Run, also much of the property captured at Baldwin, have been sent to Jacksonville. Colonel Henry left Baldwin at nine o'clock on the morning of the tenth. At a point on the railroad, four miles above Baldwin, we came across thirtsort. At one P. M., we moved forward, and arrived at Sanderson at six P. M. Sanderson is a village a little larger than Baldwin, a railroad station, and distant from Jacksonville forty miles. The rebels had left the place fifteen minutes before we emy were seen. The rebel Major Phillips had a camp of men near by not long since. The property brought away was marked Baldwin. The hospital transport Cosmopolitan on the following day went up the same river to a place called Picolata. The troop
truction of certain defences at Jacksonville, Baldwin, and the south fork of the St. Mary's, I starfty-fourth Massachusetts have been ordered to Baldwin. Don't risk a repulse in advancing on Lake Ce St. Mary's. Please report by telegraph from Baldwin. frequently. General Gillmore. [C.] Jackso1, 1864. General Seymour: [By Courier from Baldwin.] If your advance meets serious oppositionn we landed here, they were eighty miles from Baldwin, on the Albany and Gulf Railroad. You shouldt would be the south prong of the St. Mary's, Baldwin, Jacksonville, Magnolia, and Pilatka, and than again took up the line of retreat, reaching Baldwin at about three P. M. They halted here a short station on the railroad between Barber's and Baldwin we burnt a building containing two thousand b ordnance, and clothing had been hauled up to Baldwin by horse-power. Here, too, the thrice-blesserepare for us when we did advance. We left Baldwin, at the junction of the Jacksonville and Tall[9 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
guished Confederates are somewhat common; but accurate, standard pictures are comparatively rare. We are indebted to Mr. D. H. Anderson, photographer of Richmond, for a lot of the latter class. He has presented us with superb photographs,and (most of them) excellent likenesses of Generals R. E. Lee, J. E. Johnston, Stonewall Jackson, Early, J. E. B. Stuart, Heth, Mahone, G. W. C. Lee, Lilly, Jno. S. Preston, Geo. W. Randolph, John Echols, Beauregard, B. T. Johnson and D. H. Maury, Colonels John B. Baldwin, Jno. S. Mosby and Robt. Ould, Captain M. F. Maury, Hon. Robt. Toombs, Hon. R. M. T. Hunter, Hon. H. B. Grigsby, Ex-Governor Wm. Smith, Ex-President John Tyler, Hon. J. L. M. Curry, and Rev. M. D. Hoge, D. D. This donation of Mr. Anderson is a highly prized addition to our collection of photographs, and we trust that other artists will be induced to add the products of their skill, and that the friends of all of our leaders will see to it that our collection of accurate likenesse
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Powhatan troop of cavalry in 1861. (search)
ispersed to their respective homes for hasty preparation. Some of them, residing at great distances, I was informed, were unable to reach their homes at all. On the next day, Saturday, a prompt and full attendance was had at the rendezvous on the River road or turnpike, about nine miles above Richmond. That evening reported in Richmond, and were quartered in the basement of old Trinity Methodist Episcopal church. The next morning Sunday, the company was mustered into service by Colonel John B. Baldwin and Major Joe Selden, of Chapultepec fame and memory, and was ordered to march on the following day to the front; but dispatches received that night induced General Lee to change the order and to expedite the movement by taking a special train ordered for us on the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad--our point of destination being Culpeper courthouse. Two incidents in the mustering in are worthy of notice. A young son of our worthy townsman, Egbert G. Leigh, barely sixteen a boy of hi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel Baldwin's interview with Mr. Lincoln-letter from Colonel J. H. Keatley, of Iowa. (search)
Colonel Baldwin's interview with Mr. Lincoln-letter from Colonel J. H. Keatley, of Iowa. We publish the following letter as confirming the accuracy of Dr. Dabney's interesting report of Colonel John B. Baldwin's account of his interview with Mr. Lincoln. Council bluffs, Iowa, December 18, 1880. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: Dear Sir,--I have just read, in the first volume of the Transactions of your society, Dr. Dabney's paper concColonel John B. Baldwin's account of his interview with Mr. Lincoln. Council bluffs, Iowa, December 18, 1880. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: Dear Sir,--I have just read, in the first volume of the Transactions of your society, Dr. Dabney's paper concerning an interview between Mr. Lincoln and Colonel John Baldwin, of Virginia, in April, 1861. In May, 1865, I was on duty, as a Federal military officer, in Norfolk, and while the United States District Court for the eastern district of Virginia was in session there. I was introduced to Colonel Baldwin at that time, in the clerk's office, by Honorable L. H. Chandler, United States District Attorney, Colonel Baldwin being then in attendance on some business connected with that court, and havi
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