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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for O. G. Baldwin or search for O. G. Baldwin in all documents.

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as composed of the following regiments, namely, Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, Colonel Jordon; Eighth Kentucky cavalry, Colonel Baldwin; Third Kentucky cavalry, Lieutenant-Colonel King; Second Kentucky cavalry, Captain Foreman; and Tenth Wisconsin ligh was finally checked and driven back by the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry (Colonel Jordon) and Fifth Kentucky cavalry, (Colonel Baldwin,) the sabre being principally used. General Wolcott with his infantry now came up, and the enemy was driven by himall force of the enemy was encountered and dispersed by the Eighth Indiana (Colonel Jones) and the Fifth Kentucky, (Colonel Baldwin,) nine miles from Waynesboro, not, however, without a severe skirmish. On reaching Rocky Creek, the enemy was foundf fours, by battalions, had the left; the Third Kentucky, (Lieutenant-Colonel King,) the centre; the Fifth Kentucky (Colonel Baldwin) and Second Kentucky, (Captain Foreman,) the right. The advance was sounded, and in less than twenty minutes the en
November 22. Wheeler advanced with his entire corps of cavalry and three (3) brigades of infantry, drove in my pickets and skirmish line, but was finally checked and driven back by the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry (Colonel Jordon) and Fifth Kentucky cavalry, (Colonel Baldwin,) the sabre being principally used. General Wolcott with his infantry now came up, and the enemy was driven by him beyond Griswold Station. The same day Colonel Atkins (Second brigade) had some severe fighting on the Macon and Milledgeville road, and effectually prevented any attack upon our trains, that were this day moving from Clinton to Gordon.
December 2. The command moved on the Waynesboro road, in advance of a division of infantry under General Baird, the object being to cover the movements of our troops, marching in several columns on Millen. A small force of the enemy was encountered and dispersed by the Eighth Indiana (Colonel Jones) and the Fifth Kentucky, (Colonel Baldwin,) nine miles from Waynesboro, not, however, without a severe skirmish. On reaching Rocky Creek, the enemy was found in considerable force on the opposite side. General Baird's infantry came up, and a force of both cavalry and infantry crossed the creek and simultaneously charged the enemy, who rapidly retreated toward Waynesboro and Augusta, being closely pursued for some distance by the cavalry.
with artillery, as before, and his flanks so far extended, that it was useless to attempt to turn them. I therefore determined to break his centre. Colonel Murray, having the advance, was directed to make a disposition accordingly. The Eighth Indiana (Colonel Jones) was dismounted and pushed forward as skirmishers; the Ninth Pennsylvania, (Colonel Jordon,) in columns of fours, by battalions, had the left; the Third Kentucky, (Lieutenant-Colonel King,) the centre; the Fifth Kentucky (Colonel Baldwin) and Second Kentucky, (Captain Foreman,) the right. The advance was sounded, and in less than twenty minutes the enemy was driven from his position, the town gained, and Wheeler's entire force completely routed. The Fifth Ohio, Fifth Kentucky, and a portion of the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, followed in close pursuit to Briar Creek, a distance of eight miles from the point from where the first attack was made. After burning the bridges above and below, the railroad bridges as well
m that time until December tenth, participated in all the marches of the brigade, performing the usual duties of picket and train-guard, incident to a march. Captain Baldwin and his company, D, were detailed for foraging. November 18.--A portion of his men returned. December 19.--The captain, with the balance of his company,the defences of Savannah, very little was found, though the wagons emptied were immediately filled with potatoes. The forage-parties of this brigade, under Captain Baldwin, Nineteenth Michigan, Captain Anderson, Eighty-fifth Indiana, and Lieutenant Knowles, Twenty-second Wisconsin, were the first to discover, protect, and put inon the campaign, and they are now in much better condition than when the campaign opened. I wish particularly to call attention to the able manner in which Captain Baldwin, Nineteenth Michigan volunteer infantry, and Lieutenant Knowles, of the Twenty-second Wisconsin volunteer infantry, discharged their duties as commandants of
ting Assistant Adjutant-General, directed Colonel Baldwin, commanding Fifth Kentucky, to move into ho charged our left fled. This, however, Colonel Baldwin failed to do. Marched and encamped withinalry, a gallant and experienced officer. Colonel Baldwin, with the rest of his regiment, the Fiftheutenant Stetson, with his artillery, and Colonel Baldwin, with the Fifth Kentucky, in position on nel Thomas J. Jordan, Ninth Pennsylvania; Colonel Baldwin, Fifth Kentucky; Lieutenant-Colonel Jonesray, Adjutant Third Kentucky Cavalry. Colonel Baldwin's Report. headquarters Fifth Kentuck I am, sir, your most obedient servant, O. G. Baldwin, Colonel Commanding Fifth Kentucky Cavalryorses.Mules.Horses. 10852160282115915169 O. G. Baldwin, Colonel Commanding Fifth Kentucky Cavalry, Ga., or Millen's GroveWounded severely. O. G. Baldwin, Colonel Fifth Kentucky Cavalry, Commandin4,Sunbury, Ga. Total captured, fourteen. O. G. Baldwin, Colonel Fifth Kentucky Cavalry, Commandin
, and our small force must certainly have been crushed by the superior weight of the enemy, had they known our numbers. We were subsequently joined by some Louisiana regiments and General Lawton's brigade. Considerable confusion was created necessarily in the swamp and bushes, officers and men becoming separated, and regiments more or less intermingled. Yet as far as my observation extended, both officers and men behaved well. Major Holiday, Adjutant Walton, Captain Galliday, and Sergeant-Major Baldwin, were particularly brought under my notice. Captain Galliday was the only captain in the regiment on the occasion. The firing did not cease until about nine o'clock P. M., when it gradually died away, the enemy finally withdrawing. The loss of the regiment in this engagement was four killed and twenty-nine wounded. The strength of the regiment, as ascertained a short time before going into the engagement, was one hundred and thirty rank and file. The entire loss of the regiment