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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 22 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 12 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 5, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 6, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 11: Chancellorsville. (search)
l the second day at Gettysburg, and drew in pursuit of his three cavalry brigades two Federal cavalry divisions, and after ceaseless combats and night marches reached Dover, Pa., on July 1st. Whole regiments slept in their saddles, their faithful animals keeping the road unguided. Without rations for men, and with horses exhausted, Stuart arrived at Carlisle the day Hill and Ewell were engaged at Gettysburg. He wanted to levy a contribution for rations on Carlisle, but the Federal General Baldy Smith, with his Pennsylvania reserves, would not surrender the place. Its probable capture the next day was prevented by news received for the first time of General Lee's position and intentions. Stuart did not know until he received a dispatch from General Lee on the night of July 1st where he was, for the Union army had been between his march and his own army. Leaving Carlisle, he marched at once for Gettysburg, prevented a movement of the enemy's cavalry on Lee's rear by way of Hunters
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 13: campaign in Virginia.-Bristol Station.-mine Run.-Wilderness. (search)
and General David Hunter replaced Sigel in command in the Valley, with whom Crook and Averell later united. When General Lee faced Grant at Cold Harbor, Butler was still bottled up ; but twelve thousand five hundred of his force under General Baldy Smith, as he was called, had been taken out from the bottom of the bottle, placed on transports, carried down the James and up the York, landed, and marched to Grant. Lee was also re-enforced by a division of North Carolinians. On June 1st, at The ground was strewn with the dead, dying, and wounded Federals, and yet at 8 A. M. an order came from the chief of staff of the Army of the Potomac for the corps to assault again, each without reference to the other's advance. It is known that Baldy Smith positively refused to obey it, while some of the other corps commanders went through the form of opening fire, but there was no advance. Again the order was given for a general assault. It was transmitted to corps commanders, from them t
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 14: siege of Petersburg. (search)
of the James, determined to essay the capture of Petersburg before Leewho had drawn most of Beauregard's force to him on the north side-could prevent it, and would have been successful if he had not lost a day in getting his pontoons ready; and even then it could have been done if General Smith, of the Eighteenth Corps, to whom the duty was confided, had attacked when he arrived before it. Beauregard was in peril. He had re-enforced Lee, but Lee had not yet returned the compliment, and when Baldy Smith began to deploy on his front, about ten o'clock on the morning of June 15th, with eighteen thousand men, he had but twenty-two hundred soldiers to return his greetings, and had to station them so as to allow one man for every four yards and a half of his works. At 7 P. M. Smith carried with a cloud of tirailleurs the lines on a portion of his front, in spite of the heroic resistance of General Henry A. Wise, and held on to them during the night. Had Hancock, who was on the morning o
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 1 (search)
which was burning in the chimney-place, and to thrust his feet forward to give his top-boots a chance to dry. The extent of his indulgence in personal comfort in the field did not seem to be much greater than that of bluff old Marshal Suvaroff, who, when he wished to give himself over to an excess of luxury, used to go so far as to take off one spur before going to bed. At General Grant's request, General Thomas, General William F. Smith, his chief engineer, commonly known in the army as Baldy Smith, and others, pointed out on a large map the various positions of the troops, and described the general situation. General Grant sat for some time as immovable as a rock and as silent as the sphinx, but listened attentively to all that was said. After a while he straightened himself up in his chair, his features assumed an air of animation, and in a tone of voice which manifested a deep interest in the discussion, he began to fire whole volleys of questions at the officers present.
ded. I had sent some twenty orderlies with a staff officer, who led the reconnoissance; and I reported these facts constantly to Gen. Meade; but this peremptory order from him not to open fire at all prevented any pursuit of the enemy. and as the movement of the artillery and trains of a great army requires time, the Rebel pickets along their front were not withdrawn till 2 A. M. of next day. July 5. Meantime, an advance division of Couch's militia, about 5,000 strong, under Gen. W. F. [ Baldy ] Smith, had come up in our rear; reporting to Gen. Meade on the 4th. Next morning, there could no longer be even an affectation of doubt that the enemy were in full retreat; and Sedgwick's (6th) corps was ordered July 5, 11 A. M. to fellow on the track of the fugitives. The spirit in which this pursuit was prosecuted is thus portrayed by Gen. A. P. Howe, commanding a division of that corps, who thus narrates Before Committee on the Conduct of the War. its progress and results:
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
icer and his gunners tumbled down flat in great fear of Rebel sharpshooters! Baldy Smith arrived, by steamer, at Whitehouse, from Bermuda Hundreds, with heavy reiled Cool Arbor! Wright's Headquarters were here, and here, too, I first beheld Baldy Smith, a short, quite portly man, with a light-brown imperial and shaggy mousta his Headquarters) and a few words with General Wright, we paid a long visit to Baldy Smith, whose tents were pitched between the Woody house and the line of battle.ch with champagne, etc., that quite astonished us. Whether it was the lunch, or Baldy, or Bully Brooks (a General of that name), I do not know, but the Commander staman! --Lyman's Journal. who, in Fredericksburg days, had a furious quarrel with Baldy and Brooks — or they with him. So they don't speak now; and we enjoyed the mili to those who stand up against him in the way of diplomacy! Let the history of Baldy Smith be a warning to all such. It is an instructive one, and according to cam
passed down the railroad to harm you yet. Benjamin F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. [no. 67. see page 690.] New York, Dec. 7, 1891. Maj.-Gen. Benj. F. Butler, Lowell, Mass: My Dear General:--In response to your request that I should put in writing a statement as to my action as one of your staff officers on the 15th of June, 1864, in connection with the movement upon Petersburg by a portion of the Army of the James upon that day, I have the honor to say:-- Gen. Win. T. Smith ( Baldy Smith), commanding the Eighteenth Army Corps of the Army of the James, was ordered by you, as the majorgeneral commanding that army, to move upon Petersburg early on that day. His action and that of his forces under his command were most anxiously waited for by you, during the long hours of the forenoon and well into the afternoon. Becoming impatient at not hearing that he had assaulted the works of the enemy before that city, you directed me, about three o'clock in the afternoon, to ride
and started off with. They were, of course, fired at frequently, and in the course of their travels a 12-pound shot struck directly by them. They quietly picked up the shot, held on to the sheep, and brought the shot to me, yet warm. I never saw so cool and gallant a set of men; they do not seem to know what fear is. Near Yorktown, April 6, 1 A. M. . . . I find the enemy in strong force and in a very strong position, but will drive him out, Fitz-John is in the advance on the right, Baldy on the left; they are doing splendidly. Their divisions have been under fire all the afternoon; have lost only about five killed in each, and have punished secesh badly. Thus far it has been altogether an artillery affair. While listening this P. M. to the sound of the guns I received an order detaching McDowell's corps from my command. It is the most infamous thing that history has recorded. I have made such representations as will probably induce a revocation of the order, or at lea
itory which he occupied between the Appomattox and the James. That was exactly what Beauregard wanted, and the Confederate general immediately constructed field works all along Butler's front, effectually closing the neck of this bottle. Here Butler remained in inactivity till the close of the war. He built the elaborate signal tower seen in the picture so that he could observe all the operations of the Confederates, although he could make no move against any of them. Generals Gilmore and Baldy Smith both urged upon Butler the laying of pontoons across the Appomattox in order to advance on Petersburg, the key to Richmond. But Butler curtly replied that he would build no bridges for West Pointers to retreat over. Butler's signal tower The lookout The thirteenth New York heavy artillery idling in winter quarters at Bermuda hundred Butler bottled up The impassable James river The gun is in Confederate Battery Brooke — another of the defenses on the James constructe
itory which he occupied between the Appomattox and the James. That was exactly what Beauregard wanted, and the Confederate general immediately constructed field works all along Butler's front, effectually closing the neck of this bottle. Here Butler remained in inactivity till the close of the war. He built the elaborate signal tower seen in the picture so that he could observe all the operations of the Confederates, although he could make no move against any of them. Generals Gilmore and Baldy Smith both urged upon Butler the laying of pontoons across the Appomattox in order to advance on Petersburg, the key to Richmond. But Butler curtly replied that he would build no bridges for West Pointers to retreat over. Butler's signal tower The lookout The thirteenth New York heavy artillery idling in winter quarters at Bermuda hundred Butler bottled up The impassable James river The gun is in Confederate Battery Brooke — another of the defenses on the James constructe
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