Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for E. Ball or search for E. Ball in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
neral J. B. Kershaw. Wofford's brigade. Sixteenth Georgia, Major James S. Gholston. Eighteenth Georgia, Colonel Joseph Armstrong. Twenty-fourth Georgia, Colonel C. C. Sanders. Third Georgia Battalion (sharp-shooters), Lieutenant-Colonel N. L. Hutchins. Phillips's Legion, Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Hamilton. Cobb's Legion, Lieutenant-Colonel L. J. Glenn. Bryan's brigade. Tenth Georgia, Colonel W. C. Holt. Fiftieth Georgia, Colonel P. McGlashan. Fifty-first Georgia, Colonel E. Ball. Fifty-third Georgia, Colonel James P. Simms. Humphrey's brigade. Thirteenth Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel A. G. O'Brien. Seventeenth Mississippi, Captain J. C. Cochran. Eighteenth Mississippi, Colonel T. M. Griffin. Twenty-first Mississippi, Colonel D. N. Moody. Kershaw's [old] brigade. Second South Carolina, Colonel J. D. Kennedy. Third South Garolina, Colonel W. D. Rutherford. Seventh South Carolina, Captain E. J. Goggans. Eighth South Carolina, Colonel J. W. H
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
ucing 2,000 to 2,500 stands per month in all—were the only prospective resources at home. With additional workmen, and some extension of the machinery, much larger results could be obtained. But the workmen were not to be had. As it was, it would take many months to put it in working order. Parts were missing, and some injury done in the hasty transfer (partly under fire The saving of this machinery from the flames, was due to the heroic conduct of the operatives themselves, headed by Mr. Ball, the master armorer, who clung to his machinery, and by the greatest efforts, continued often under fire, saved almost the entire plant. The names of Mr. Copeland and Major W. S. Downer are also mentioned in this connection. The older brother, Frederick, was a most competent mechanic, and a man of decided administrative ability. He was almost the only one who succeeded in producing a good service arm. He was finally killed in the trenches at Savannah, fighting with a command composed of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Arsenals, workshops, foundries, etc. (search)
ucing 2,000 to 2,500 stands per month in all—were the only prospective resources at home. With additional workmen, and some extension of the machinery, much larger results could be obtained. But the workmen were not to be had. As it was, it would take many months to put it in working order. Parts were missing, and some injury done in the hasty transfer (partly under fire The saving of this machinery from the flames, was due to the heroic conduct of the operatives themselves, headed by Mr. Ball, the master armorer, who clung to his machinery, and by the greatest efforts, continued often under fire, saved almost the entire plant. The names of Mr. Copeland and Major W. S. Downer are also mentioned in this connection. The older brother, Frederick, was a most competent mechanic, and a man of decided administrative ability. He was almost the only one who succeeded in producing a good service arm. He was finally killed in the trenches at Savannah, fighting with a command composed of