hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 97 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 46 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 37 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 35 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 18 2 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 17 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for George Bancroft or search for George Bancroft in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 6 document sections:

ortly after returned a subscription paper which Sumner had sent to him, with the reply that no papers would be received from one who had approved an attack on his family. Ante, vol. II. pp. 254, 255. The intervention of Prescott was necessary to restore good relations, broken in consequence of an offhand and overheard remark. The prison-discipline controversy of 1845-1847, treated later in these pages, will show how family sympathies gave a personal direction to public controversies. Bancroft, the historian, escaped from a community where a Democrat was regarded as little better than a Jacobin, and years after his removal assured a friend that it was a comfort to live in New York rather than in Boston. R. H. Dana, Jr., wrote to Sumner in 1851, Boston oligarchy is confined to the pavements and Nahant. Prescott wrote to Sumner in 1851 of a former period in Salem similar in character: Judge Story in his early days was exposed to much obloquy from the bitterness of party feeling,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
soon after my last, to announce the coming of Bancroft as our minister. You know his genius, his br; so is the first half of Threnody. To Mrs. Bancroft, February 28:— Your three little sheet The spirit is equal to the melody. To Mrs. Bancroft, December 15:— I was happy to hear fature on narrow means, and in 1846 wrote to Mr. Bancroft, then Secretary of the Navy, urging this apCreole letter. See ante, vol. II. p. 193. Mr. Bancroft, then Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Pakenham, lliam Kent, B. D. Silliman, John Jay, and George Bancroft To Mrs. Bancroft, for whom he had a gr you in high places far from mine. In 1874 Mr. Bancroft had arranged for a winter home in Washingtohree successive ministers to England—Everett, Bancroft, and Lawrence— assured him in letters of the om devotion to his country. The historian, Bancroft, in a conversation with the writer, made a cows little faith in Franklin or in Vergennes. Bancroft works hard upon his History, and will put two[2 more.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
inctly passing upon the issues which we present? I do not know that the latter may not be the better course, but I doubt. But I throw out these things for your consideration, repeating the assurance of my confidence in your judgment. To Mrs. Bancroft, Mr. Bancroft was now our minister to England. February 28:— Do not think me too extreme on the subject of slavery. I have no opinion now which I have not long maintained, and I suspect often expressed under your roof. I doubt not Mr. Bancroft was now our minister to England. February 28:— Do not think me too extreme on the subject of slavery. I have no opinion now which I have not long maintained, and I suspect often expressed under your roof. I doubt not that opinions are sometimes attributed to me beyond any that I entertain. In my view, every constitutional effort ought to be made to restrain and abolish slavery. In this I am quite in earnest; but I am disturbed not a little by those who attack the Constitution and Union, and I do not wish to be confounded with them. I make this explanation because I inferred from something Lord Morpeth wrote me that you might have given him an erroneous idea of the exact extent of my opinions. But whateve
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
nd of unquestionable facts you have shown the aggressive character of the mexican War, and still further the foul slaveholding motives in which it had its origin. I think that the just historian hereafter will be compelled to adopt your views, and to hold the war up to the indignation and disgust of posterity. I am very anxious that a history of the Mexican War should be written in the spirit of peace. Some time ago an application was made to my friend Mr. Prescott, and I think also to Mr. Bancroft, to write the history of the second Conquest of Mexico; General Scott's papers were to be placed at their disposal. They have declined. I am glad of it. I would not have them soil their pens by such work unless they can see it as an occasion for diffusing the principles of peace. I long to see history written in the spirit of human brotherhood. There would then be no pompous efforts to make war attractive; but it would be always exposed as an assault upon God's image and a violation o
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
he other two portraits were of Washington and Hamilton. He remarked that no people at its cradle had been surrounded by men of so high a character as those in our Revolution and at the formation of the Constitution. He lamented the mediocrity which he found now in France. Among the very young there was talent; but among those between twenty-five and forty there was an absolute want of all remarkable talent. This was the case, he understood, also at the bar. Alluding to the studies of Mr. Bancroft and Mr. Sparks in the department of foreign affairs, he thought the latter had puise; the most. Returned the call of Sir Robert Dallas. Went to M. Vattemare, who accompanied me to the Imprimerie Imperiale, where spent some time, and also to several other places in that legion of Paris; dined with Mr. Henry James, Of Boston (1811-1882.) American writer on social and philosophical subjects; father of the novelist. who is here wit his family; then went to Lamartine, who was in bed wit
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
, I should think we talked together nearly three quarters of the time continuously. We discussed literary subjects,—Hannibal's campaigns, Italian writers, Manzoni's Promessi Sposi; French and Italian morals; love, including some of Sumner's experiences; society, wherein S. told me a great deal of his English and foreign acquaintanceships; law, including his relations with George T. Curtis, B. F. Hallett, Judge Fletcher, R. C. Winthrop, George S. Hillard, etc.; persons, including Prescott, Bancroft, Lord Brougham, Bunsen, Tocqueville, etc. I broached to him my criminal law theories, and he encouraged me to pursue them, suggesting the aid that I should find in Bentham. He also spoke of having read an Italian criminalist whose name was not familiar to me, but whom he praised with great warmth. He told me curious chapters in Franklin's history; . . . in Lord Palmerton's, which he had heard from the Duchess of Sutherland; and an account of Lord Palmerton's giving him the particulars of