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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 97 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 46 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 37 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 35 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 18 2 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 17 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. You can also browse the collection for George Bancroft or search for George Bancroft in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 7: the corner stone laid (search)
rue, and yet it is impossible to compare the two books without seeing that kind of assimilation which is only made more thorough by being unconscious. Longfellow, even thus early, brought out more picturesquely and vividly than Irving the charm exerted by the continent of Europe over the few Americans who were exploring it. What Irving did in this respect for England, Longfellow did for the continental nations. None of the first German students from America, Ticknor, Cogswell, Everett, or Bancroft, had been of imaginative temperament, and although their letters, as since printed, Harvard Graduates' Magazine, VI. 6. revealed Germany to America as the land of learning, it yet remained for Longfellow to portray all Europe from the point of view of the pilgrim. When he went to England in 1835, as we shall see, he carried with him for English publication the two volumes of one of the earliest literary tributes paid by the New World to the Old, Outre-Mer. It is a curious fact that Mr.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 9: illness and death of Mrs. Longfellow (search)
ion of a careful study of German literature This he traced from its foundations down to Jean Paul Richter, who was for him, as for many other Americans of the same period, its high-water mark, even to the exclusion of Goethe. It will be remembered that Longfellow's friend, Professor Felton, translated not long after, and very likely with Longfellow's aid or counsel, Menzel's History of German Literature, in which Goethe is made quite a secondary figure. It is also to be noticed that George Bancroft, one of the half dozen men in America who had studied at a German University, wrote about the same time a violent attack on Goethe in the Boston Christian Examiner, in which he pronounced him far inferior to Voltaire, not in genius and industry only, but still more in morality. He says of him farther, He imitates, he reproduces, he does not create and he does not build up. . . . His chances at popularity are diminishing. Twaddle will not pass long for wisdom. The active spirit of mo
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 12: voices of the night (search)
ems of Longfellow, where things in themselves most prosaic are flooded with a kind of poetic light from the inner soul. The Lover's Seat, London, i. 36. It is quite certain that one may go farther in looking back upon the development of our literature and can claim that this simplicity was the precise contribution needed at that early and formative period. Literature in a new country naturally tends to the florid, and one needs only to turn to the novels of Charles Brockden Brown, or even Bancroft's History of the United States, to see how eminently this was the case in America. Whatever the genius of Poe, for instance, we can now see that he represented, in this respect, a dangerous tendency, and Poe's followers and admirers exemplified it in its most perilous form. Take, for instance, such an example as that of Dr. Thomas Holley Chivers of Georgia, author of Eonchs of Ruby, a man of whom Bayard Taylor wrote in 1871, speaking of that period thirty years earlier, that something won
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Index (search)
Appleton, Frances E. See Longfellow, Frances A. Appleton, Nathan, 121,171. Appleton, Thomas G., 103, 219, 273. Arfwedson, Mr. and Mrs., 93, 95. Arnold, Mr., 70. Arnold, Matthew, 6. Atchafalaya, Lake, 195. Athenaeum Library, 285. Atlantic Monthly, the, cited, 233 note; mentioned, 287. Auersberg, Anton A., 161. Austen, Mrs., Sarah, 269. Austin, William, 64, 68 and note. Auteuil, 46. Bacon, Lord, 164. Baireuth, 289. Baltic Sea, 132. Balzac, Honore de, 177. Bancroft, George, 71, 112; his History of the United States, mentioned, 143. Bandmann, 241, 242. Barbauld, Mrs., Anna Letitia, 62, 63. Barlow, Joel, 23. Barnard, Mr., 91. Bartlett, Elizabeth. See Wadsworth, Elizabeth B. Bartlett family, the, 13. Beattie, James, 62. Beaugency, 48. Becker, Rudolph Z., 161. Belgium, 158, 170. Bennett, Dr., 250. Bennoch, Mr., 250. Bentham, Mr., 91. Berlin, 98. Bernadotte, King, 94. Berryer, Antoine Pierre, 47. Besse, 239. Bierstadt, Mr., 22