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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
the line when it turned to the southward, or cutting off a disabled vessel. The leading ship of the main squadron was the frigate Wabash, Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, followed by the frigate Susquehanna, Captain J. L. Lardner; sloop Mohican, Commander S. W. Godon; sloop Seminole, Commander J. P. Gillis; sloop Pawnee, Lieutenant Commanding R. H. Wyman; gun-boat Unadilla, Lieutenant Commanding N. Collins; gun-boat Ottawa, Lieutenant Commanding T. H. Stevens; gun-boat Pembina, Lieutenant Commanding J. P. Bankhead; and the sailing sloop Vandalia, Commander F. S. Haggerty, towed by the Isaac Smith, Lieutenant Commanding J. W. A. Nicholson. The flanking squadron was led by the gun-boat Bienville, Commander Charles Steedman, followed by the Seneca, Lieutenant Commanding Daniel Ammen; gun-boat Curlew, Lieutenant Commanding P. G. Watmough; gun-boat Penguin, Lieutenant Commanding T. A. Budd; and the gun-boat Augusta, Commander E. G. Parrott. The plan of attack was to pass up midway betw
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Port Royal, November 7th, 1861. (search)
; sidewheel steamer Susquehanna (15 8-inch, 1 24-pounder, 2 12-pounders), Captain J. L. Lardner; sloop Mohican (2 11-inch, 4 32-pounders, I 12-pounder), Commander S. W. Godon; Seminole (1 11-inch, 4 32-pounders), Commander J. P. Gillis; Pocahontas (1 10-inch, 4 32-pounders), Commander Percival Drayton; Pawnee (8 9-inch, 2 12-pounders), Lieutenant R. H. Wyman; gun-boats Unadilla, Lieutenant Napoleon Collins; Seneca, Lieutenant Daniel Ammen; Ottawa, Lieutenant T. H. Stevens; Pembina, Lieutenant J. P. Bankhead (each of the four latter carried 1 11-inch, 1 20-pounder rifle, and 2 24-pounders); sailing sloop Vandalia (4 8-inch, 16 32-pounders, 1 12-pounder), Commander F. S. Haggerty; steamer Bienville (8 32--pounders, 1 30-pounder rifle), Commander Charles Steedman; Augusta (8 32-pounders, I 12-pounder), Commander E. G. Parrott; Curlew (6 32-pounders, 1 20-pounder rifle), Lieutenant P. G. Watmough; Penguin (4 32-pounders, 1 12-pounder), Lieutenant T. A. Budd; R. B. Forbes (2 32-pounders),
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.63 (search)
e turret forms a water-tight joint with the ring on the deck, why was oakum packed under the turret before going to Charleston? The commander of the vessel, Captain Bankhead, in his report of the foundering, adverts to the admission of water under the turret, but does not duly consider the serious character of the leak, sixty-three feet in length. Captain Bankhead evidently had not carefully investigated the matter when he attributed the accident to an imaginary separation of the upper and lower hull. Captain J. P. Bankhead says in his report: Found [in the morning] that the packing of oakum under and around the base had loosened somewhat from the worCaptain J. P. Bankhead says in his report: Found [in the morning] that the packing of oakum under and around the base had loosened somewhat from the working of the tower as the vessel pitched and rolled towards evening the swell somewhat decreased, the bilge-pumps being found amply sufficient to keep her clear of the water that penetrated through the sight-hole of the pilot-house, hawse-hole, and base of tower (all of which had been well calked previous to leaving). At 7:30 the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.64 (search)
Butts, a survivor of the Monitor's ) Crew. At daybreak on the 29th of December, 1862, at Fort Monroe, the Monitor hove short her anchor, and by 10 o'clock in the forenoon she was under way for Charleston, South Carolina, in charge of Commander J. P. Bankhead. The Rhode Island, a powerful side-wheel steamer, was to be our convoy, and to hasten our speed she took us in tow with two long 12-inch hawsers. The weather was heavy with dark, stormy-looking clouds and a westerly wind. We passed oud ship. As we were cut loose I saw several men standing on top of the turret, apparently afraid to venture down upon deck, and it may have been that they were deterred by seeing others washed overboard while I was getting into the boat. Commander Bankhead reports Thomas Joice among the missing.-editors. After a fearful and dangerous passage over the frantic seas, we reached the Rhode Island, which still had the tow-line caught in her wheel and had drifted perhaps two miles to leeward. W