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hat the New York Banks had resolved to make common stock of their specie, and pay it out as long as it lasts, but it is generally supposed here, among those who ought to know, that they will probably all suspend before the close of the week. Our Banks have been pretty liberal in paying out specie to-day in small amounts to those who were in need of it. At the Corn Exchange a marked improvement was observable, buyers being anxious to purchase flour for export, but holders not quite so wille excitement attending this suspension, thus contrasting most singularly with the panic of 1857. At a meeting of merchants, at Alexandria, Va., Thursday, the following resolution was adopted: Resolved, It is the opinion of this meeting that the suspension of specie payments by the Banks of this city, is justified by the force of recent events beyond their control; and that the ability of said Banks to meet all their engagements, and their soundness, is not impaired by this course.
bility of the dissolution of the Union, she is utterly powerless to dissuade any other State from seeking or promoting its dissolution. The nullification laws of Massachusetts were not only most deliberately enacted in the first instance, but the question of their repeal has been earnestly moved in the Legislature of the State, first by Mr. Charles Hale and afterwards by myself; and although some provisions of mere exacerbation in those laws have been repealed on the recommendation of Gov. Banks, yet the vicious substance still subsists, and has but just been carefully re-enacted in the general revision of the statutes. Furthermore, so long as the State of Massachusetts perseveres in this nullification of the Constitution, she affords, not a pretext only, but a justificatory cause to the State of South Carolina, to that of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, or any other State otherwise disposed to secede; for the violation of the fundamental compact of association by one of the c
pay the current rates of exchange, whatever they were, or to decline to pay. The matter was in their own hands, and each one must act for himself. He desired to see some arrangement made with the city Banks by which the notes of solvent country Banks would be received, and thus save the retail trade from a ruinous sacrifice. He therefore offered the following resolution, which was unanimously adopted: Resolved, That this meeting recommend to the city Banks to receive on deposit, and pay oment made with the city Banks by which the notes of solvent country Banks would be received, and thus save the retail trade from a ruinous sacrifice. He therefore offered the following resolution, which was unanimously adopted: Resolved, That this meeting recommend to the city Banks to receive on deposit, and pay out as current funds, the notes of all solvent Banks in the State. On motion of Mr. J. B. Ferguson, the meeting adjourned to meet again on Monday evening next, at 6 o'clock.
Complimentary Laver. --A complimentary levee was given to Gov. Banks, of Mass. and lady, Wednesday night by the citizens of Waltham, Mass., irrespective of party, at which the Governor was presented with a service of silver plate, and Mrs. Banks a valuable gold watch. The contemplated departure of Gov. Banks for the West ctary levee was given to Gov. Banks, of Mass. and lady, Wednesday night by the citizens of Waltham, Mass., irrespective of party, at which the Governor was presented with a service of silver plate, and Mrs. Banks a valuable gold watch. The contemplated departure of Gov. Banks for the West causes much regret among his neighbors. tary levee was given to Gov. Banks, of Mass. and lady, Wednesday night by the citizens of Waltham, Mass., irrespective of party, at which the Governor was presented with a service of silver plate, and Mrs. Banks a valuable gold watch. The contemplated departure of Gov. Banks for the West causes much regret among his neighbors.
r cent, premium; and on Philadelphia and Baltimore at 2 ½ or 3 per cent. The Banks of the two latter cities having all suspended, the question as to what notes our Banks would receive on deposit and what they would not, was also unsettled. Their notions on this point changed often.--It will be possibly some days before things setterence Committees, he was satisfied that they would be willing to do what they could to relieve the mercantile community, so far as the receipt of notes of country Banks, on deposit could relieve them. On this statement being made, a resolution was adopted, recommending the city Banks to "receive on deposit and pay out" the notes of all solvent Banks in this State; and then the meeting adjourned to meet again on Monday evening next. The signs of increasing alarm and embarrassment are quite abundant. Yesterday we received news of the failure of the house of Harris & Sons, Baltimore, prominent Bankers of that city. The pressure is severe in all directi
--Remaining in the Richmond Post-Office, on the 23d day of November, 1860. Published by authority of Act of Congress, in the newspaper having the largest circulation in the District where printed. Persons calling for letters in this List, will please say they are Advertised. Ladies' List. Atkisson miss M A Ayres miss K Ashbrook miss R P Askine miss A D Attkisson miss M S Austin mrs M C Amos miss M Allen mrs G A Black miss Barnette miss M E Barr mrs S S Banks mrs S A Barker miss C A Battailo miss E C Barlow mrs E Birch miss M Blankinship mrs H Blakey mrs M F Blair mrs N E Buchett miss S E Blanchard mrs J A Booth mrs C R Bonsal mrs J Bowers mrs H Bowen miss C C Braxton miss M E Bradshaw miss L J Brackins mrs L Brown mrs A Brooks miss J Burrows miss H E Cake mrs Sarah F Cabaniss mrs A M B Carr mrs Mary A Carper mrs M J Carey mrs Mary E Carroll mrs Electa Carter mrs C M Chappell mrs E B Cook mr
orgia demand the repeal of the laws of Northern States nullifying the Fugitive Slave Law, because such laws are unconstitutional, and this further resolution: Resolved, That the interest and honor of Georgia demand the enactment by Congress of laws removing the obstructions to the introduction, and preventing for the protection in the Territories of all property recognized by the Constitution and decisions of the U. S. Supreme Court. Resortedthat the repeal of the laws contemplated in the first resolution, and the enactment of those called for in the second, are the only conditions upon which Georgia, consistent with right and self-respect, can remain in the Union. Augusta, Ga., Nov. 23. --It is reported here to-day that Gov. Brown will veto any bill ioning the suspension of the Banks unless Georgia secedes. There are rumors that one or more Charleston Banks have suspended, and also a large Catton house — name not given. The report needs confirmation.
ous consequences, if not in the ruin, it may involve, any that ever occurred in this country. It has been announced by telegraph that the Georgia Legislature passed the Bank bill over the Governor's veto. The bill repeals the law forbidding Banks from sending their notes out of the State for the purpose of discounting drafts; it repeals the restriction against selling but sight checks, and in view of the monetary troubles and accessions, suspends the operation of the acts inflicting the pbill over the Governor's veto. The bill repeals the law forbidding Banks from sending their notes out of the State for the purpose of discounting drafts; it repeals the restriction against selling but sight checks, and in view of the monetary troubles and accessions, suspends the operation of the acts inflicting the pain of forfeiture for not paying specie; prohibits levying fas. in favor, or against suspended Banks during suspensions, provided in either case satisfactory security is given.
tion of the money market half that amount could not be realized. the Charleston Mercury thus notices the Bank suspension there: the suspension of all our Banks yesterday, a measure of mere policy and not of necessity, was the of general congratulation among our business community. As an instance of the perfect soundness of our Charleston Banks, we append the statement of one of them (the Union Bank) at the close of yesterday's operations: Exchange — Sterling$19,430.35 Exchange — Northern (due within 30 days)352,342.13 Exchange — Southern (due within 30 days)233,963.96 Coin184.25 Balance due by City Banks42,512.76 Circulation197,63Banks42,512.76 Circulation197,635.00 Deposits180,880.42 The Baltimore Exchange, in its report of Friday evening, says: No very marked change has taken place in the condition of the money market for some days past, but for the last day or two stocks have been heavy and depressed, and the general feeling in financial circles is less hopeful than it w
Arrest of a Suspicious character. The Memphis Argus, of the 14th, says: Yesterday officer O'Brien arrested a man calling himself J. M. Barber, who has been prowling about the city for some time, attired by day in citizen's dress and at night donning a Captain's uniform. His representations of his business and occupation are as numerous as his haunts. Upon being arraigned in police court this morning, he was discharged for want of proof, and went on his way rejoicing. Charleston Banks. The following patriotic resolutions were passed at a meeting of Directors from the several banks in Charleston, held on the 6th instant, all the banks being represented: 1. Resolved, That the several banks in Charleston will continue to receive Treasury notes in payment of all dues to themselves, and also on deposits, and will receive payment in the same medium for all paper sent to them for collection; and they hereby decline all collections for which payment in Treasury n
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