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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 286 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 219 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 218 2 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 199 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 118 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 92 2 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 91 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 84 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909 66 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 59 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Nathaniel P. Banks or search for Nathaniel P. Banks in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate defense of Fort Sumter. (search)
d the whole length of the crest, to the point where he was met by three others of the same command, C. B. Foster, W. C. Buck-heister, and A. J. Bluett, who had clambered up by the ladders. But his comrades were ready, and with their assistance he managed to display the flag in about twelve minutes. They were all exposed to great danger. One shell struck the flag-staff out of their hands. January 29th, 1864, the flag was shot away at the same locality, and replaced by Privates Shafer and Banks, assisted by Corporal Brassingham, all of Lucas's Battalion of Artillery, and greatly aided by the acting adjutant of the post, H. Bentivoglio Middleton of the Signal Corps. Later in the same year, the flag of the post was moved to the center of the gorge-wall, at a point on the crest, accessible by a short ladder from the top of the bombproof quarters. The practice with two 30-pounder Parrott rifles, at Cumming's Point, distant three-quarters of a mile, was so fine that more than three
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The army before Charleston in 1863. (search)
nds, upon which the enemy derived no advantage from his superior strength or from the railroad facilities under his control for concentrating troops and bringing reinforcements from the interior on short notice. It was finally decided that the army should undertake the capture of Morris Island and the reduction of Fort Sumter, unless it should become necessary, before preparations for the attack were completed, to detach some of the troops for the purpose of reenforcing General Grant or General Banks, then operating on the Mississippi; and it was announced with emphasis that no additional troops would be sent to South Carolina. The capture of the city by a land attack was not, in any sense, the object of these operations. No project of that nature was discussed or even mentioned at the conference. The following general plan of campaign was agreed upon, comprising four distinct steps, and the army was to take the lead in executing the first, second, and third. First, to make a de
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
met General Sherman, it; was expected that General Banks would be through with the campaign upon wh and hold it, and with his troops and those of Banks to hold a line through to Mobile, or at least ion of the Mississippi River had done before. Banks was not ready in time for the part assigned toseded in command of the Gulf Department by General Banks, General Butler was not in active service s efficient as any other cavalry commander. Banks in the Department of the Gulf was ordered to anto which blockade-runners could enter. General Banks had gone on an expedition up the Red Rivertors. By direction of Halleck I had reenforced Banks with a corps of about ten thousand men from Sheral plan. But the expedition was a failure. Banks did not get back in time to take part in the pe Gulf were thus paralyzed. It is but just to Banks, however, to say that his expedition was order but cooperative columns. As stated before, Banks failed to accomplish what he had been sent to [2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
al W. S. Rosecrans in command of the Department, and Army, of the Cumberland, October 19th, 1863.--editors. near Chattanooga; that of the Tennessee, under McPherson, scattered front Huntsville, Alabama, to the Mississippi; that of the Gulf, under Banks, in Louisiana; besides subordinate detachments, under Steele and others, in Arkansas and farther west. Grant took the whole field into his thought. He made three parts to the long, irregular line of armies, which extended from Virginia to Texas. He gave to Banks the main work in the south-west; to Sherman the middle part, covering the hosts of McPherson, Thomas, Schofield, and Steele; and reserved to himself the remainder. The numbers were known, at least on paper; the plan, promptly adopted, was simple and comprehensive: To break and keep broken the connecting links of the enemy's opposing armies, beat them one by one, and unite for a final consummation. Sherman's part was plain. Grant's plan, flexible enough to embrace his ow
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
e as urged by General Grant, General Banks, Banks to Halleck, July 23d, 30th, and August 1st, 18 campaigns is indicated in his dispatch to General Banks of July 24th: I think Texas much the most ercome another at its end. Accordingly, General Banks reverted to his first idea of making the amy's lines at Alexandria, the united forces of Banks, Sherman, and Porter should meet those of Stee J. Smith were at Alexandria ahead of time. Banks himself was detained at New Orleans by the nece been wasted on this; the fact being that General Banks simply carried out the orders of Presidenttaining the most important city in the South. Banks therefore confided to Franklin, under whom thend, if possible, harass the enemy. At first Banks was for resuming the advance, but during the nhe Government, for reasons of state. When General Banks sent them all back from Alexandria, withou March, as soon as he became satisfied that Banks's army meant to advance once more up the Teche[43 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
landing of Smith's force at Simsport; from which point they were to march by land to Alexandria, where the junction with Banks's army was to be made. The Eastport (Lieutenant-Commander S. L. Phelps), Osage (Lieutenant-Commander T. O. Selfridge), Fhe fleet, to occupy the town until the arrival of the land forces under General A. J. Smith. It had been agreed that General Banks should be at Alexandria by March 17th, but the cavalry did not arrive till the 19th, and his whole force was not asseds and Pleasant Hill, April 8th and 9th, the fleet were entirely ignorant until a courier reached Admiral Porter from General Banks stating that the army was falling back upon Grand Ecore. Signal was made for commanding officers to repair on boar bare, while the channel between them was hardly twenty feet wide, and three feet deep. No spring rise had come, and General Banks with the army was anxious to leave Alexandria and the region where no laurels had been gained. What should be done w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Red River campaign. (search)
in the Red River campaign. As constituted about April 1st, 1864, with subsequent changes of Union commanders partly indicated. The Union Army.-Major-General Nathaniel P. Banks. Headquarters Troops (Guard): A and B, Capt. Richard W. Francis. (Escort): C, Capt. Frank Sayles. Thirteenth Army Corps (detachment), Brig.-Gen James H. Corrin; 22d Infantry (92d U. S. C. T.), Col. Henry N. Frisbie. In his testimony before the Committee on the Conduct of the War (p. 21, Vol. II.), General Banks says: we started with the idea that we were to have a concentrated command of at least 35,000 to 40,000 men, when in fact we had less than 20,000, and but ed with the fleet (1721), it will be seen that the marching column consisted on the 31st of March of 25,736 officers and men of all arms. In his official report Banks says: In these operations (up to April 26th), in which my own command had marched by land nearly 400 miles, the total loss sustained was 3980 men, of whom 289
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 6.49 (search)
arch of seventy miles through the pine woods. Banks now pressed forward from Berwick Bay, by the lg supplies. Steele on the Little Missouri and Banks at Natchitoches were but about one hundred mils hesitation and the reports of the advance of Banks's cavalry caused me, on the 4th of April, to mere still lying, brought the intelligence that Banks had precipitately retreated after the battle, rairie d'ane. I deemed it imprudent to follow Banks below Grand Ecore with my whole force, and lealor, but before the junction could be effected Banks had gone. To return to Taylor, after the enpe that he could seriously impede the march of Banks's column. After the latter reached Alexandriay force would have been united against him. Banks evacuated Alexandria on the 12th and 13th of Mth's army was to recede before the army of General Banks, falling back through the State of Texas, command since 1862,--in fact before either General Banks or myself,--and I ordered the cotton to be[13 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Resume of military operations in Missouri and Arkansas, 1864-65. (search)
ere attempted. During this period of inactivity, however, Steele was making preparations for a vigorous spring campaign. It was decided that the column under General Banks and the columns under General Steele from Little Rock and Fort Smith should converge toward Shreveport, Louisiana. The Federal columns under Steele left Littlmanoeuvring drove General Price's forces from Camden, Arkadelphia, and Washington. In the midst of these successful operations, Steele received information that Banks's army had been defeated and was retreating On learning the defeat and consequent retreat of General Banks on Red River . . . General Steele determined to fall General Banks on Red River . . . General Steele determined to fall back to the Arkansas River. [Report of General U. S. Grant. Appendix to Memoirs, p. 592.] [see p. 354], and that Price had received reenforcements from Kirby Smith of 8000 infantry and. a complement of artillery, and would at once assume the offensive. Not feeling strong enough to fight the combined Confederate forces, Steele de
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.51 (search)
crossing Dog River bar (over which they had to be floated with camels ), put a stop to the planting of torpedoes, effectually prevent blockade-running, and easily capture the garrisons of the forts. But, much to his regret, the army under General Banks started up the Red River, and he was left alone with his little fleet to watch the operations he could not prevent. At last, about May 20th, the great ram Tennessee made her appearance in the lower bay. Just before she arrived, and when it w, I have reluctantly brought myself to it. I have always deemed it unworthy a chivalrous nation, but it does not do to give your enemy such a decided superiority over you. In the same letter he speaks of the discouraging news just received of Banks's defeat, and adds: I see by the rebel papers Buchanan is advertised to raise the blockade as soon as he is ready. As I have before informed the department, if I had the military force . . . and one or two iron-clads, I would not hesitate to
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