Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for N. P. Banks or search for N. P. Banks in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: Marylanders in the campaigns of 1861. (search)
rs at Washington into the Department of Annapolis and Gen. N. P. Banks was assigned to command it vice Cadwallader, relieved, with headquarters at Baltimore. Banks assumed command on June 10th. On the 27th he arrested George P. Kane, marshal of po commissioners protested against this violation of law, and Banks arrested them and sent them to join Kane. They sent a memo laid it on the table. They applied to the President, and Banks put them on a steamer July 28th and sent them to Fort Lafayof New York as well as in the Department of Annapolis. General Banks appointed Col. John R. Kenly marshal of police, who proSimon Cameron, secretary of war, had issued an order to General Banks that the passage of an ordinance of secession by the lecommanding the army of the Potomac, issued his order to General Banks to have everything prepared to arrest the whole party when they assembled. General Banks sent his aide, R. Morris Copeland, to attend to this business, and he accomplished it very
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
nd another in the valley of Virginia under General Banks. While McClellan transported his great arwas to march down west of the Alleghanies, and Banks was to move directly up the valley,—the latterfully developed. Jackson required more men. Banks in front had more than four times his number, ackson sped back to Staunton, moved swiftly on Banks, who had got to Strasburg, and ordered Ewell ta day, then twenty, then thirty, and it was on Banks before he knew Jackson had left McDowell. Chen within an easy march of Front Royal, where Banks had stationed a force to protect his flank. Tss. Kenly performed an inestimable service to Banks. He held Jackson back for twelve hours, and thus gave Banks opportunity to fall back from Strasburg to Winchester. On the 24th Ewell moved uphe wall. It appeared that they had penetrated Banks' center, between his right and left wing, and ine of battle, and the fields were filled with Banks' fugitives. The Maryland colonel brought his [1 more...]
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: Maryland under Federal military power. (search)
where during the summer it was reinforced by new recruits. Maj.-Gen. N. P. Banks was assigned to command this army and picketed the Potomac ot to raise his arm against a sister Southern State, applied to General Banks to work into the Maryland election so that a killing majority sup against secessionism. General McClellan issued an order to General Banks, calling his attention to the alleged apprehension among Union intention of the lambs below them to muddy the stream. He directed Banks to garrison the polls, and see that no disunionists are allowed to 8, 1861, to Capt. R. Morris Copeland, assistant adjutant-general on Banks' staff: Previous to the election a number of enemies to the U Casey; in and around Washington, General Stone at Poolesville, and Banks at Darnestown, up to Williamsport, General Kelly at Cumberland, wheiment, as we have seen, served with distinction in the valley under Banks in 1862. The Second was with Burnside at New Bern, N. C. There the