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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
any one had attempted to seize the unfortunate prisoner as he left the Old State House, that person and all who abetted him would have been liable to a criminal prosecution for attempting to rescue a prisoner held by due process of law, as well as for inciting a riot. Dogberry could not have surpassed this invention for putting the mob in the wrong. The religious press, except the New England Spectator and Zion's Herald (Methodist), was in accord with the secular. The Christian Watchman (Baptist) pronounced the abolitionists equally Lib. 5.175. culpable with the mob. Tracy's Recorder (Congregationalist) said it was Mr. Garrison's settled policy to provoke Lib. 5.184, 185. mobs as much as he can, and so identify his cause with the cause of civil liberty, to the distress of worthy citizens thus forced to choose between him and the mob. The Christian Register (Unitarian) saw no adequate Right and Wrong, 1836, (1) p. 63. excuse for a mob in the meeting of a few black and white lad
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
ade manifest to all, for severe and unerring tests will be applied frequently: it will not be possible for him to make those sacrifices, or to endure those trials, which unbending integrity to the cause will require. For ourselves, we care not who is found upon this broad platform of our common nature: if he will join hands with us, in good faith, to undo the heavy burdens and break the yokes of our enslaved countrymen, we shall not stop to inquire whether he is a Trinitarian or Unitarian, Baptist or Methodist, Catholic or Covenanter, Presbyterian or Quaker, Swedenborgian or Perfectionist. However widely we may differ in our views on other subjects, we shall not refuse to labor with him against slavery, in the same phalanx, if he refuse not to labor with us. Certainly no man can truly affirm that we have sought to bring any other religious or political tests into this philanthropic enterprise than these:— Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself — Whatsoever ye would that men should
ts at Richmond, 479; Board of For. Missions reply to London Board, 479, 484; Nat. Baptist A. S. Convention, 2.356.—See also N. Colver, E. Galusha, C. P. Grosvenor, W.sistance, 282; opposes enrolment of women, 297; debate with H. C. Wright, 328; Baptist delegate to World's Convention, 356, lodges with G., 383, opposes admission off Francis Jackson, 2.60. Farnham, Harriet, 1.124. Farnham, Martha, devoted Baptist, 1.24, 27, lodges Abijah and Fanny Garrison, 24, 60, kindness to the latter, 2. Gairdner, Harriet, 2.385. Gales & Seaton, 1.238. Galusha, Elon, Rev., Baptist delegate to World's Convention, 2.356, opposes admission of women, 370, temper56, Isaac Knapp, 56; Fourth of July oration before Franklin Club, 56; holds to Baptist tenets, familiar with Bible, 56; discovers his nearsightedness, 56; desires to, Cyrus P., Rev., opposes Am. Union for the Relief, etc., 1.469; mobbed, 2.67; Baptist delegate to World's Convention, 356, 365, lodges with G., 383, temperance spee