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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 156 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 9, 1864., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 8 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War 8 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Baptist or search for Baptist in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
he resolution. We cannot nowadays understand the superstition formerly attached to the stigma of infidelity, both on the part of those who sought to fasten and of those who sought to avoid it. In the popular imagination it belonged in the category of self-operative curses, and was conclusive of all argument. Hence it availed little for Mr. Garrison Lib. 11.43. to reason that if the Chardon-Street Convention was infidel because some infidel addressed it, it was Orthodox because Phelps, Baptist because Colver, and Methodist Ante, 2.427. because Father Taylor, did likewise. Nor could he hope to escape the imputation of being a double and treble dyed infidel for his attendance at the adjourned second and third sessions of that Convention, which fell in the year now under consideration. Convicted, too, of having headed this ungodly gathering in the beginning, the head and front of its offending he must remain to the bitter end. True, Edmund Quincy, who actually headed it, declared
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
r communion tables. Will you see to it that they never ascend your pulpits? If you will, then the slave will bless you, and thanks from the American abolitionists will come over in thunder tones for your decision, and you will give a blow to slavery from which it will not recover. We ask another thing of you. Send us no more delegates to the States, or, if you do, let there be no divinity about them. Nothing but common humanity can stand in the United States. (Cheers.) Send us no more Baptist clerical delegates, or Methodist, or Presbyterian, or Quaker clerical delegates. They have all played into the hands of slavery against the abolitionists. (Cheers.) From Dr. C——down to the last delegation, they Rev. F. A. Cox; ante, 1.480. have all done an evil work, and have strengthened slavery against us. Like the priest and the Levite, they have passed us by and gone on the other side. They found the cause of abolitionism unpopular. The mass of society were pro-slavery, so they wen
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
rt period, where conscientious and upright persons have been thrust into prison for an act no more intrinsically heinous than that of gathering in a crop of hay, or selling moral or philanthropic publications. Allusion is here made to the case of Charles C. Burleigh, who in February, 1847, was twice put in jail in West Chester, Pa. (the second time for six days), for selling anti-slavery books on Sunday (Lib. 17.54, 59; Penn. Freeman, Mar. 25, 1847). For the conviction of a Seventh-Day Baptist farmer for working, in Pennsylvania, on Sunday, see Lib. 18: 119. There is, therefore, no liberty of conscience allowed to the people of this country, under the laws thereof, in regard to the observance of a Sabbath day. The last sentence originally read, . . . observance or non-observance of the first day of the week as a holy day. In addition to these startling facts, within the last five years a religious combination has been formed in this land, styling itself the American and Fo
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
ourt-room, and the whole land is shaken! A hundred free, white citizens of the North may be thrown into prison, or tarred and feathered, or compelled to flee for their lives at the South, on suspicion of being morally averse to the slave system; See, this very year, the cases of Elijah W. Harris, school-teacher at Clinton, S. C. (tarred and feathered—Lib. 21: 26); Dr. Larkin B. Coles, physician and physiological lecturer, at Columbia, S. C. (imprisoned—Lib. 21: 31); Rev. Edward Mathews, Baptist preacher, at Richmond, Ky. (ducked in a pond—Lib. 21: 41, 46); Rev. Jesse McBride, Wesleyan preacher, near Greensboroa, N. C. (expelled the State–Lib. 21: 98). but who cares? A thousand colored seamen of the North may be incarcerated in loathsome cells, and Ante, p. 92. compelled to pay for their imprisonment, though guiltless of crime, and even sold into slavery on the auction-block at the South; but whose breast burns with indignation, or what voice calls for redress? Official State C
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
m sadly ashamed of many things which I send out simply because I have not strength to copy them. Harriet Beecher Stowe to W. L. Garrison. [Andover], Cabin, December 12, 1853. Ms. On one point I confess myself to be puzzled. Why are Wright, etc., so sensitive to the use of the term infidel? If Henry C. Wright. I understand H. Wright's letters in the Liberator, he openly professes to be what is called commonly an infidel. Names are given for conveniencea sake—such as Unitarian, Baptist, Universalist, Infidel. They mark the belief of the individual. If H. Wright is not an infidel, what is he? I inquire honestly, for if anybody had asked me if he was one, I should have answered yes without a moment's hesitation, in the same manner as I should have said that May was a Unitarian. . . . S. J. May. I find the following numbers missing from the Liberator of this year, and should like to have them sent me: 27, 28, 29, 30, 39, 41, 49. Harriet Beecher Stowe to W. L. Garr