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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Barbauld or search for Barbauld in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
e, —no titles are given to Mad. de Lafayette, and to her husband only Major-General and Deputy; and on each gravestone is recorded the date of their respective births, of their marriage, and of their deaths, and the two stones are united by a cross. October 27.—Ugoni—who has been frequently to see us of late, chiefly to talk about Confalonieri, whose case excites everywhere great remark—carried me this evening to the weekly soiree of Mad. Mojon. Mad. Bianca Milesi-Mojon translated Mrs. Barbauld's Hymns and some of Miss Edgeworth's Tales into Italian; and a sketch of her life was published by Emile Souvestre, in 1854. She is an Italian, her husband a Spaniard, long a professor of medicine and physician at Genoa, and both are great friends of Confalonieri, Sismondi, and other persons of mark. They live here to enjoy their fortune and educate their children. I found several agreeable people there, and passed a pleasant evening. . . . October 30.—At the Duke de Broglie's, t
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
and pleasantest for you to receive us. Only you must not go off to be Governor-General of India or Minister of State at home; for there we shall never follow you. I do not wonder you are perplexed about J. Indeed, I partly foresaw the case, and I think you did last summer when we talked about it. But in this world we must not be like the good old lady, who asked at the bookseller's shop for the smallest-sized Bible with the largest-sized print. And apropos of this, did you ever read Mrs. Barbauld's Essay on Inconsistent Expectations? It is a little harsh and uncomfortable in its tone, but there is a cruel wisdom in it about education, which often comes up to plague me. . . . . I have always had two fixed ideas about young men: first, that they should be substantially educated in the country where they are probably to live; and second, that not a small part of the value of a university or public-school education consists in adjusting a young man, during the most flexible period o