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Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 12: (search)
Chapter 12: Night-ride to Jackson's camp. return across the Mountains. we are cut off by the enemy. fight at Barber's cross-roads. retreat towards Orleans and across the Rappahannock. fights near Waterloo Bridge and Jefferson. Crossing of the Hazel river. bivouac in the snow. scout with General Stuart. headquarters near Culpepper Court-house. reconnaissance in force, and fight near Emmetsville. 4th November. The deep sleep which succeeded to the fatigues of the previous day had hardly fallen upon me, when I was aroused by the touch of Stuart's hand upon my shoulder. The General's wish was that I should bear him company, with several of our couriers and Dr Eliason, who was well acquainted with all the roads in the neighbouring county, to the headquarters of General Jackson, who had encamped about twelve miles off, on the opposite side of the Shenandoah, near the village of Millwood. The command of our cavalry had been temporarily transferred to Colonel Ros
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 155 (search)
ly covered behind his works. About 100 men of the Eighty-second Indiana were sent forward to fight for this new position, whilst the main line was advanced and the position fortified. Almost one-fourth of this gallant little band (22) were killed or wounded during the day. Each of my other regiments, especially the Thirty-first and Seventeenth Ohio, suffered severely whilst we occupied this position. It was here the noble young Ruffner gave up his life for his country. Captains Stone and Barber, of the Thirty-first Ohio, were both wounded here, the latter severely in the head. The enemy had laid a firm hold upon the Utoy Hills. On the — of August we challenged his right to hold them by a bold advance, and day after day and night after night, until the 11th, did we hold him in a deadly embrace. At 9 p. m. of the 11th we moved about three-fourths of a mile to the right and relieved a portion of General Morgan's division. This position we held until thenight oth e he nihh. Othe6
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of Olustee, or Ocean Pond, Florida. (search)
hich, with the loss of twenty-five of his men, killed and wounded, and without loss to the Confederates, he dislodged, and proceeded to within three miles of Lake City, when he was recalled, and on the 11th joined the main body, which had reached Barber's plantation on the south fork of the St. Mary's. Here the command was delayed for the lack of transportation. The railroad had been relied on for trans-portation, but there was only one engine on the road, and that in such wretched condition thhe eastern bank, put out pickets, and took a good sleep. Colonel Henry and his mounted men and the 7th Connecticut stopped at Baldwin over the night of the 21st. General Finegan's report of the 23d (three days after the battle) says: I occupy Barber's place this morning and my cavalry are in the vicinity of Baldwin. He says, also, I left Ocean Pond [the battle-field] yesterday--that is to say, two days after the fight. The reports of Generals Colquitt, Finegan, Gardner, and others give r
o Finnegan! Gillmore at once wrote him a strong remonstrance against the madness of his project — which was, in effect, to pit his (at most) 6,000 disposable men against whatever force the Rebels, with all Georgia and Alabama to draw from, and railroads at command, might see fit to concentrate upon him. Gen. Turner was sent post-haste with this letter; but it was too late. When he reached Jacksonville, he met there tidings that Seymour was already fighting at Olustee. Seymour had left Barber's (the south fork aforesaid) that morning, Feb. 20. with a few short of 5,000 men; advancing westward along the highway which runs generally parallel with the railroad, frequently crossing it, till about 2 P. M., when the head of his column ran square into the dead-fall which Finnegan had set for him. Our men were faint with hunger and a hard march of 16 miles over miry or sandy ground, until, two or three miles east of Olustee station, our van reached a point where the railroad is carri
storian says that a braver man never lived; a truer man never wore the garb of Christianity. At Resaca, among the Confederate dead which lay so thickly in front of the Twenty-seventh seventh Indiana, was a family group: a gray-haired Chaplain and his two sons. The official reports make frequent mention of Chaplains whose gallantry and zeal had attracted the notice of their general. In the Chancellorsville reports, General Berdan, commander of the famous Sharpshooters, states that Chaplain Barber, of the Secondl Regiment, took a rifle and went in with the skirmishers, with his usual bravery. At Antietam, Gen. J. R. Brooke mentions in his report the brave Chaplain of the Sixty-sixth New York, Rev. Mr. Dwight, who was constantly in the field, in the thickest of the fight. Gen. Giles A. Smith, in his report of the battle of Atlanta (July 22d), states that Chaplain Bennett, of the Thirty-second Ohio, carried his musket and fought all day in the ranks. which I learn is his cus
1862. From near Waterloo Bridge, 8.45 P. M. To General Pope: Trains and troops still passing over the same route. A deserter just come in says, Longstreet's corps, embracing Anderson's, Jones's, Kemper's, Whitney's, and Evans's divisions, are located in the woods back of Waterloo Bridge; thinks Hill's division at Jefferson, Jackson's corps somewhere above Longstreet's. He appears truthful, and I credit his story. The entire district from Jefferson to Culpeper, Sperryville, and as far as Barber's covered with smoke and lines of dust. The deserter reports the arrival last evening of the greater portion of Longstreet's corps at its present position. (Signed) John S. Clark, Colonel and A. D.C. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Colonel and A. D.C. headquarters Third corps, Warrenton, August 26, 9 P. M. Major-General Pope: An intelligent negro has just come in to Gen. Buford from White Plains, and reports the advance of the enemy's column at that place. He says he saw himsel
1862. From near Waterloo Bridge, 8.45 P. M. To General Pope: Trains and troops still passing over the same route. A deserter just come in says, Longstreet's corps, embracing Anderson's, Jones's, Kemper's, Whitney's, and Evans's divisions, are located in the woods back of Waterloo Bridge; thinks Hill's division at Jefferson, Jackson's corps somewhere above Longstreet's. He appears truthful, and I credit his story. The entire district from Jefferson to Culpeper, Sperryville, and as far as Barber's covered with smoke and lines of dust. The deserter reports the arrival last evening of the greater portion of Longstreet's corps at its present position. (Signed) John S. Clark, Colonel and A. D.C. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Colonel and A. D.C. headquarters Third corps, Warrenton, August 26, 9 P. M. Major-General Pope: An intelligent negro has just come in to Gen. Buford from White Plains, and reports the advance of the enemy's column at that place. He says he saw himsel
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 87.-the campaign in Florida. (search)
get a sight at one. At eleven A. M., we reached the station called Barber's. Here we halted to allow the advance-guard to go ahead and see ifish at the South-Fork. Captain Elder placed his guns in battery at Barber's, and the Fortieth Massachusetts regiment formed in line of battleed and three wounded. The wounded were taken to a house, owned by Mr. Barber, where their wounds were dressed by the surgeon who accompanied trced into the service, and when he heard that we were on our way to Barber's urged the other rebels to throw down their arms and give themselvity of sabres, carbines, and pistols. I learn this place is called Barber's from the fact that a man named Barber formerly kept here a sort oBarber formerly kept here a sort of hotel. His own house, with five or six out-houses, are the only buildings in the vicinity. Barber. left the premises on the morning of ouretts, (colored,) under Captain Webster, proceeded ten miles east of Barber's, and destroyed a bridge over the St. Mary's River. The bridge wa
All troops are therefore being moved up to Barber's, and probably by the time you receive this, left at Baldwin, detaching three companies to Barber's. Colonel Barton will have the Forty-sevenuarters, your forces would be in motion beyond Barber's, moving toward the Suwanee River; and that ying a little less than five thousand men, left Barber's at seven o'clock Saturday morning, and procetant from the battle-field. On the march from Barber's, our troops passed through Sanderson at abouThe men had not rested from the time they left Barber's, at seven A. M. The usual halt of a few minuept well up to the rear of Henry's column. At Barber's, our men rested till nine A. M., and then agt a small number of small-arms. The road from Barber's to Baldwin was strewn with guns, knapsacks, nkets. At a station on the railroad between Barber's and Baldwin we burnt a building containing to it with the force of fatality. When he left Barber's early on the nineteenth, he was told that he[6 more...]
hough obstinately resisted by the Twenty-eighth and Thirty-seventh North Carolina regiments. Colonel Barber, of the Thirty-seventh, finding his right turned, changed front with his three right companiade as soon as his wound was dressed. Amongst the field officers wounded are Colonels Turney, Barber, Purdie Lieutenant-Colonel George, First Tennessee; Majors Vandegraff, Norton, Lee, Neill, and Brs later the enemy advanced in strong force across the open field to the right of my front. Colonel Barber, his regiment being on the right, informed me, through Adjutant Oates, of the advance, and wrossed the Rappahannock. I cannot speak in too high terms of the gallantry of Colonels Avery, Barber, Lowe, and Purdie, and Lieutenant-Colonel Hill. They all commanded their regiments with bravery, and to my entire satisfaction. Colonel Purdie was slightly wounded. Colonel Barber received a painful wound in the neck, which, for a time, paralyzed his right arm, but he reported for duty again
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