Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for William Barker or search for William Barker in all documents.

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Holland. Company G.--Wounded--First Lieut. Thomas S. Hamblin, in the leg. Privates Edward Sweeney, Benjamin Taylor, (all taken prisoners,) Henry Lansing. Missing--Henry Hedge, Thomas H. Kerr, Patrick McGinn, William H. Millett, Charles J. Rydecker, George Wright, (all supposed to have been taken prisoners.) Company H.--Killed--Private John Orman. Wounded--Norton Schermerhorn, slightly; Luthur L. Mills, both arms shot off, (a prisoner;) Hugh F. Dunnigan, in leg, (a prisoner;) William Barker, in leg; John Robson, in neck; John Hallam, slightly in head; Robert F. Robertson, badly bruised; Isaac Richie, slightly in leg; George B. Stevens, slightly in the back; Robert F. Robertson, badly bruised; Menzo W. Hoard, leg bruised; John Welsh, slightly in hand. Missing--Privates William Ross, John Lamphier, (supposed prisoners.) Company I.--Killed--William E. Straight, First Sergeant; Fourth Corporal, John McBride, and Charles H. Cooper. Wounded--Sylvanus Greer, Theodore Hami
e Seventy-first; took a short cut across the fields, when the cavalry galloped up and arrested me. They took me back to the hospital, where, during the confusion, I managed to conceal myself under a blanket, which was saturated with blood. Col. Barker, of the Virginia cavalry, then galloped up, and ordered all the unwounded prisoners to be driven to the Junction. I should think there were about 50 prisoners in all at that point. They left me, supposing I was wounded. A guard was left t Cornelius, Col. Martin's servant, who was wounded while assisting the colonel to dismount, also died. Mullen, Second Rhode Island, and two of the Seventy-first, whose names I do not know, were found dead next morning. Gen. Beauregard and Col. Barker came up about 7 1/2 o'clock that evening with 150 prisoners of different regiments, most of whom were Fire Zouaves. He stopped and inquired how our wounded were getting along, while the prisoners were driven towards the Junction by the cavalr
l this was taken, and against that the legion, as a forlorn hope, was led. In their first charge they had advanced to Henry's house, and were passing through the garden, when Col. Hampton was shot down. Without his further orders they were confused. Thus, Lieut.-Col. Johnson had fallen, and Capt. Conner, of the Washington Light Infantry, senior captain, led them back to form them; retiring under cover of the hill, they found the Seventeenth Virginia regiment, Col. Withers, and through Adjutant Barker, proposed that he should join them, which he did. They formed their line of battle; Capt. Conner led the legion. They tore down upon the enemy through a storm of balls. They reserved their fire until within a certain distance of the enemy. With a single volley they swept the guns of men and horses. The infantry sustaining them gave way before the charge of bayonets, and raising their colors over one, and not knowing in exactly what form to assert a priority of claim to the other, Ca