Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for E. Barksdale or search for E. Barksdale in all documents.

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C. J. Munnerlyn, Thomas S. Ashe, O. R. Singleton, J. L. Pugh, A. H. Arrington, Walter R. Staples, A. R. Boteler, Thomas J. Foster, W. R. Smith, Robert J. Breckinridge, John M. Martin, Porter Ingram, A. A. Garland, E. S. Dargan, D. Funsten, Thomas D. McDowell, J. R. McLean, R. R. Bridges, G. W. Jones, B. S. Gaither, George W. Ewing, W. D. Holder, Daniel W. Lewis, Henry E. Read, A. J. Davidson, M. H. Macwillie, James Lyons, Caspar W. Bell, R. B. Hilton, Charles J. Villers, J. W. Moore, Lucien J. Dupre, John C. Atkins, Israel Welsh, William G. Swan, F. B. Sexton, T. L. Burnett, George G. Vest, William Porcher Miles, E. Barksdale, Charles F. Collier, P. W. Gray, W. W. Clarke, William W. Boyce, John R. Chambliss, John J. McRae, John Perkins, Jr., Robert Johnston, James Farrow, W. D. Simpson, Lucius J. Gartrell, M. D. Graham, John B. Baldwin, E. M. Bruce, Thomas B. Hanly, W. P. Chilton, A. H. Kenan, C. M. Conrad, H. M. Bruce, David Clopton, W. B. Machen, D. C. De Jarnette, H. C. Chambers.
d, and are on the way to Alexandria. Fort De Russy takes its name from Colonel De Russy, who formerly commanded in this vicinity, and lives not far distant. Lieutenant-Colonel Bird was in command, though he reported to General Walker, whose headquarters were at Alexandria. The following officers are prisoners: Captains Stevens, Morran, Wise, Wright, Laird, and King; Lieutenants Denson, Fuller, Fogarty, Claydon, Trumbull, (Eng.,) Burbank, Hewey, Assenheimer, Fall, Hauk, Ball, Little, Barksdale, Spinks, Bringhurst, and Stout. From various sources we gather that the rebels here have about abandoned the idea of defending any of their navigable streams. When asked to account for their apparent neglect of so important a fort, they reply that this was considered merely as an experiment in engineering, (certainly a very creditable one, and one which the gunboats alone might have vainly assailed for a: month,) but claim that so soon as we leave the rivers they will fall on us for de
olk: Major-General Forrest reports, at nine A. M., yesterday evening, two miles south of Pontotoc, we have had severe fighting all day with the enemy. The engagement closed about dark. We have killed about forty of the enemy and captured about one hundred prisoners. Our loss is not known, but is not so heavy as that of the enemy. The prisoners captured report that two of their colonels and one lieutenant-colonel was killed this evening. Colonel Forrest was killed this evening. Colonel Barksdale was badly wounded in the breast. Colonel McCollock was wounded in the head. We have captured four or five pieces of artillery. General Gholson came up this evening, and will follow after them, and drive them as far as possible. The fight commenced near Okolona late this evening, and was obstinate, as the enemy were forced to make repeated stands to hold us in check, and to save their pack-mules, etc., from a stampede. The fight closed with a grand cavalry charge of the enemy's who
ss the field by a shell, and would have been taken had not some of the men pulled him out. He succeeded in capturing a rebel horse and leaving the field on its back. Colonel Brisbin lost his trunk, in the baggage train, the sash taken from General Barksdale on the field at Gettysburgh, which had been made a present to him, and General Villipigue's sabre, taken from him in Virginia. Colonel Robinson, while defending the wagontrain on the first day, was shot in the hip, but refused to leave tnett as a trophy. The Tribune correspondent, Mr. Wells, lost his good clothes and other fixins. Colonel Brisbin, of General Lee's staff, lost some five hundred dollars' worth of clothing and money, together with the sash worn by the rebel General Barksdale, which was captured at Gettysburgh, and a valuable sword also captured near Gettysburgh. It is ascertained that our dead who were left on the field between Pleasant Hill and Sabine Cross-Roads, were buried by the enemy, and that the woun