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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 120 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 87 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 86 4 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 65 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 58 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 39 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 19 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for William Barksdale or search for William Barksdale in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 7 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
n; Ga. Legion (Cobb's)-; 2d La., Col. J. T. Norwood (mn w); 15th N. C., Col. Henry A. Dowd (w); Ga. Battery (Troup Arty.), Capt. Henry H. Carlton. Brigade loss: k, 66; w, 347; m, 2 ==415. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Richard Griffith (m w), Col. William Barksdale: 13th Miss., Col. William Barksdale, Lieut.-Col. J. W. Carter (w), Maj. Kennon McElroy; 17th Miss., Col. W. D. Holder (w), Lieut.-Col. John C. Fiser; 18th Miss., Col. Thomas M. Griffin (w), Lieut.-Col. William H. Luse; 21st Miss., Col. BeCol. William Barksdale, Lieut.-Col. J. W. Carter (w), Maj. Kennon McElroy; 17th Miss., Col. W. D. Holder (w), Lieut.-Col. John C. Fiser; 18th Miss., Col. Thomas M. Griffin (w), Lieut.-Col. William H. Luse; 21st Miss., Col. Benjamin G. Humphreys, Lieut.-Col. W. L. Brandon (w), Capt. William C. F. Brooks; Va. Battery (1st Richmond Howitzers), Capt. E. S. McCarthy. Brigade loss: k, 91; w, 434 ==525. artillery, Lieut.-Col. Stephen D. Lee: Ga. Battery (Pulaski Arty.), Capt. J. P. W. Read; Va. Battery (James City Arty.), Capt. L. W. Richardson; Va. Battery (Magruder Arty.), Capt. T. Jeff. Page, Jr. Longstreet's division, Maj.-Gen. James Longstreet (also in command of A. P. Hill's division), Brig.-Gen. Richard H. An
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
as far as the possession of the field was concerned, was practically a victory for the Federals. Though their loss was three times as great as that of the Confederates, they accomplished the main purpose of the battle, which was to gain time for the passage of trains, artillery, and troops across White Oak Swamp. The Confederate force engaged in this fight was commanded by General J. B. Magruder, and consisted of Semmes's and Kershaw's brigades, Kemper's battery, and two regiments of Barksdale's brigade opposite our left. Cobb's division and two guns of Hart's battery were north of the railroad to the right of our line. Cobb's infantry was not engaged. About a half-hour after the fight was ended, I suggested to General Sumner that if he had no objection I would carry out the commanding general's orders, so far as I was concerned, and cross the White Oak Swamp with General Smith's division. We were then on the field. His answer was, No, General, you shall not go, nor will
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan's change of base and Malvern Hill. (search)
e to General Jackson that the condition upon which the order was predicated was not fulfilled, and that I wanted instructions. He replied to advance when I heard the shouting. We did advance at the signal, and after an unassisted struggle for an hour and a half, and after meeting with some success, we were compelled to fall back under cover of the woods. Magruder advanced at the same signal, having portions of the divisions of Huger and McLaws, comprising the brigades of Mahone, Wright, Barksdale, Ransom, Cobb, Semmes, Kershaw, Armistead, and G. T. Anderson; but he met with some delay, and did not get in motion till he received a second order from General Lee, and we were then beaten. The Comte de Paris, who was on McClellan's staff, gives this account of the charge of my gallant division: Hill advanced alone against the Federal positions. . . . He had therefore before him Morell's right, Couch's division, reenforced by Caldwells brigade, . . and finally the left of Kearny
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Notes on Crampton's Gap and Antietam. (search)
d my efforts, and those of my staff who were with me, to General Cobb's, and cooperated with him for a considerable time in the vain effort to rally the men. General McLaws moved Wilcox's brigade of R. H. Anderson's, and later Kershaw's and Barksdale's brigades of his own division, to the support of Cobb, but not in time to take part in the engagement. The report of General McLaws shows that he accurately appreciated the effect of our success in completely shutting up his command on Maryladed, would have required a much greater force than ours to have carried. I am unable to give the numbers, but McLaws, in his report of the operations of the day, states that he formed the line across the valley with the brigades of Kershaw and Barksdale, except one regiment and two guns of the latter, and the remnants of the brigades of Cobb, Semmes, Mahone, and Wilcox, which he afterward states were very small. The only force available for an attack would have been Smith's division of abou
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
C. Holt (w), Capt. P. H. Loud; 53d Ga., Lieut.-Col. Thomas Sloan (w), Capt. S. W. Marshborne; 15th Va., Capt. E. M. Morrison (w), Capt. Edward J. Willis; 32d Va., Col. E. B. Montague. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 56; w, 274; m, 43 = 373. Barksdale's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Barksdale: 13th Miss., Lieut.-Col. Kennon McElroy (w); 17th Miss., Lieut.-Col. John C. Fiser; 18th Miss., Maj. J. C. Campbell (w), Lieut.-Col. William H. Leese; 21st Miss., Capt. John Sims, Col. Benjamin G. HumphreBrig.-Gen. William Barksdale: 13th Miss., Lieut.-Col. Kennon McElroy (w); 17th Miss., Lieut.-Col. John C. Fiser; 18th Miss., Maj. J. C. Campbell (w), Lieut.-Col. William H. Leese; 21st Miss., Capt. John Sims, Col. Benjamin G. Humphreys. Brigade loss (in the campaign): 11, 35; w, 272; 11, 4 = 311. Artillery, Maj. S. P. Hamilton, Col. Henry C. Cabell: N. C. Battery, Capt. Basil C. Manly; Ga. Battery (Pulaski Art'y), Capt. John P. W. Read; Va. Battery (Richmond Fayette Art'y), Capt. M. C. Macon; Va. Battery (1st Co. Richmond Howitzers), Capt. E. S. McCarthy; Ga. Battery (Troup Art'y), Capt. H. H. Carlton. (Loss of the artillery included with that of the brigades to which attached.) Anderson's division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The surrender of Harper's Ferry. (search)
hat the limits of this article do not permit the recital here. There were other incidents in the history of the events under consideration highly creditable to the troops constituting the garrison of Harper's Ferry. General Kershaw's report to General McLaws of the capture of Maryland Heights, on the 13th, states that he met with a most obstinate resistance from our force stationed there, a fierce fire being kept up at a distance of one hundred yards, and it was not till he had sent General Barksdale's brigade to attack the works in rear that the heights were evacuated. The fighting with Jackson's advance in front of Bolivar Heights, on the afternoon of the 14th and on the morning of the 15th, by the troops posted in that quarter, was deliberate, systematic, and plucky. The artillery was admirably handled, and if there had been anything like an equality of position, its effect would have been more decided. It would be invidious to specify the action of certain brigades, regime
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.77 (search)
half-past 12 I sought Jackson to report that from the front of my position in the wood I thought I had observed a movement of the enemy, as if to pass through the gap where I had posted Colonel Cooke's two regiments.o I found Jackson in rear of Barksdale's brigade, under an apple-tree, sitting on his horse, with one leg thrown carelessly over the pommel of his saddle, plucking and eating the fruit. Without Confederate dead on Ti-E West side of the Hagerstown road opposite the corn-field. Frear. But there was little sleep for the ambulance corps; and all night long their lanterns could be seen flashing about the battle-field while they were searching for and bringing in the wounded, of friend and foe alike. In company with General Barksdale of Mississippi, whose brigade was on my left, I rode over that part of the battle-field where our own troops had been engaged, to see that none of the wounded had been overlooked. While passing along a worm fence, in the darkness, we heard