hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 120 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 87 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 86 4 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 65 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 58 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 39 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 19 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William Barksdale or search for William Barksdale in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Mississippi troops who served in Virginia, 1861-1865. (search)
therstone, who was transferred to Mississippi, now dead. General Carnot Posey, killed at Bristow Station. General N. H. Harris, who survived the war, now dead. This Brigade suffered severely at the Bloody Angle, battle of Spotsylvania, but was able to recover it from the enemy. 13th Mississippi Regiment, 17th Mississippi Regiment, 18th Mississippi Regiment, 21st Mississippi Regiment, comprising the Brigade commanded by General Richard Griffith, killed at Savage Station. General William Barksdale, killed at Gettysburg. General B. G. Humphries, who survived the war, now dead. Ward's Madison County Mississippi Battery. Jeff Davis Legion of six Companies of Cavalry, commanded by General James G. Martin. General Martin is still living at Natchez, Miss. Another Regiment of Infantry, the 20th Mississippi, served a short time in West Virginia, under General John B. Floyd, but was transferred to the Southern Department early in the war. All the above information was furni
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
y white folks above the freedom you talk about, and if I am ever free it got to come from them. Dr. Christian was unable to remember the names of the officers from Port Hudson, which is to be regretted, but I submit that no stronger proof of the loyalty of the negroes is needed than is given in the history of the Johnson Island prisoners. It may not be out of place to relate a few instances which came under my own observation. The first two years of the war I served with Griffith's-Barksdale's Mississippi Brigade. In the company I belonged to was a gallant fellow, Kit Gilmer, who was badly wounded at Sharpsburg. Our wounded were placed in a large stone barn, near the battlefield. When the army recrossed the Potomac, on Friday, September, 19, 1862, I ran into the barn, as we passed by, to see my wounded friends. I bid Kit Gilmer and others good-by, believing I would never see them again. After remaining a day or so near Shepardstown, we fell back to Winchester, and amon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of Company E, Nineteenth Virginia Infantry. (search)
t; promoted first lieutenant in the fall of 1862; promoted captain early in 1863; mortally wounded in the battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863; died there in field hospital, July 18, 1863. Thurman, Benjamin W., third lieutenant; not re-elected at the reorganization. Taylor, Albert G., first sergeant; accidentally shot at Manassas, June 10, 1861, and died twelve hours afterwards: Foster, Anthony, second sergeant; discharged by conscript act of 1862; over thirty-five years of age. Barksdale, Franklin, third sergeant; captured at Yorktown, April 26, 1862; exchanged August 5, 1862. Bragg, James Y., fourth sergeant; promoted through different grades to first lieutenant; captured July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg; exchanged March 10, 1865. Salmon, James, fifth sergeant, promoted through different grades to first lieutenant; wounded in shoulder July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg; commanded the company from July 5, 1863, to his death in battle at Hatcher's Run, March, 1865. Gilbert, Ro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.68 (search)
me General Jackson rode up and directed General McLaws to strike McClellan about Dunkards' Church and drive him back. Kershaw's Brigade rested near the church. Barksdale's next, Semmes' next, Cobb's Legion next, I think, and Fitz Lee's Cavalry next on the river. I think that was about the formation of the line about where we wenught as we came out of a piece of woods to the field I saw General Jackson. I think the 10th Georgia was on the right of our brigade (which was in echelon with Barksdale's Brigade), the 32nd next, the 15th next, I think, and the 53rd Georgia on extreme left. As we emerged from the piece of woods, Colonel Montague gave command, Bed across that terrible, bloody field. Looking to my right, I witnessed one of the most magnificent sights that I ever saw, or ever expect to see again. It was Barksdale's men driving the enemy up into and through a piece of woods in their front. Their fire was so steady and severe that it looked like a whirlwind was passing thr