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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 23 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 20 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 17 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
nded without equivalent. The offer was not accepted until the following December, and it was during that period that the greatest mortality occurred. The Federal authorities stood by and coldly suffered their soldiers in our prisons to die, in order that they might fire the Northern heart with stories of Rebel barbarities. 7. But the charge of cruelty made against the Confederate leaders is triumphantly refuted by such facts as these: The official reports of Secretary Stanton and Surgeon-General Barnes show that a much larger per cent. of Confederates perished in Northern prisons than of Federals in Southern prisons. And though the most persistent efforts were made to get up a case against President Davis, General Lee and others (even to the extent of offering poor Wirz a reprieve if he would implicate them), they were not able to secure testimony upon which even Holt and his military court dared to go into the trial. We have a large mass of documents on this subject, and the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
t malignant stories of Rebel barbarities to helpless veterans of the Union. 7. But the charge of cruelty made against the Confederate leaders is triumphantly refuted by such facts as these: The official reports of Secretary Stanton and Surgeon General Barnes show that a much larger per cent. of Confederates perished in Northern prisons than of Federals in Southern prisons. And though the most persistent efforts were made to get up a case against President Davis, General Lee, and others (evey 22,576 died; while of the Confederate prisoners in Federal hands 26,436 died. This report does not set forth the exact number of prisoners held by each side respectively. These facts were given more in detail in a subsequent report by Surgeon General Barnes, of the United States Army. His report I have not seen, but according to a statement editorially, in the National Intelligencer--very high authority — it appears from the Surgeon General's report, that the whole number of Federal prisone
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Colonel D. T. Chandler, (search)
not?--on the 19th of July, 1866--send to the library and get it — exhibits the fact that of the Federal prisoners in Confederate hands during the war, only 22,576 died, while of the Confederate prisoners in Federal hands 26,436 died. And Surgeon-General Barnes reports in an official report — I suppose you will believe him — that in round numbers the Confederate prisoners in Federal hands amounted to 220,000, while the Federal prisoners in Confederate hands amounted to 270,000. Out of the 270,0 and in rags, it is true; but a healthier, hardier set of fellows never marched or fought, and they died in Northern prisons (as we shall hereafter show) because of inexcusably harsh treatment. These official figures of Mr. Stanton and Surgeon-General Barnes tell the whole story, and nail to the counter the base slander against the Confederate Government. Failure to make a case against Mr. Davis. But a crowning proof that this charge of cruelty to prisoners is false; may be more clearly<
at Washington by saying: Our victory is complete The enemy is driven (?) back into Virginia. Maryland and Pennsylvania are now safe! Again he added; The Confederates succeeded in crossing the Potomac on Friday morning with all their transports and wounded, except some three hundred of the latter! On the twentieth, however, their army began to move Fitz-John Porter taking the advance, who judged, from the extremely quiet look of all things on the Virginia shore, that we were far inland. Barnes's brigade of Pennsylvanians, supported by one of regulars, under chief command of General Sykes, moved towards the river, and forded the stream at Boteler's Mills. Heavy guns were planted on the Maryland shore to cover their crossing. Jackson had felt certain that the enemy would attempt to pursue, and he made no display of force likely to intimidate them. The passage of the river was undisputed, except by a few small field-pieces; and when they had landed in Virginia, our gunners took
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 12: Gettysburg. (search)
venty-two thousand men, and Wellington sixty-eight thousand, a total of one hundred and forty thousand, while the total of the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia was about one hundred and sixty thousand. Both armies mourned the death of brave men and competent officers. In the Army of the Potomac four general officers were killed-Reynolds, Vincent, Weed, and Zook-and thirteen wounded, viz., Hancock, Sickles, Gibbon, Warren, Butterfield, Barlow, Doubleday, Paul, Brook, Barnes, Webb, Stanard, and Graham. In the Army of Northern Virginia five general officers were killed-Pender, Garnett, Armistead, Barksdale, and Semmesand nine wounded, viz., Hood, Hampton, Heth, J. M. Jones, G. T. Anderson, Kemper, Scales, and Jenkins. Meade showed no disposition to assume the offensive after Pickett's repulse. Like Lee at Fredericksburg, he did not want to lose the advantages of position, and was not certain the battle was over. The relative numbers in each army were stil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
& Ohio railroad, and was not in the fight at Gettysburg). Stuart after fighting at Brandy Station, on the 9th of June, a large body of Federal cavalry supported by infantry, and forcing them to recross the Rappahannock river with a loss (to them) of four hundred prisoners, three pieces of artillery, and several colors, (General Lee's report), marched into Loudoun county upon the right flank of the army, and was engaged in a series of conflicts, terminating with Pleasonton's cavalry corps and Barnes' division of infantry, upon the 21st June, which caused him to retire to the vicinity of Ashby's Gap in the Blue Ridge, our infantry being upon the western side of the mountains. 165 Leaving the brigade before mentioned to hold the position, Stuart then, in the exercise of a discretion given him by General Lee and so stated in his report, determined to pass to the rear of the Federal army and cross the Potomac at Seneca Falls, a point between that army and their capital. Thus, it will be
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 18: Lee's invasion of Maryland, and his retreat toward Richmond. (search)
e of Antietam. others, he deferred a renewal of the battle until the next morning. When that morning dawned, and he sent his cavalry to reconnoiter, the National army had no foe to fight, for Lee, with his shattered legions, had recrossed the Potomac under cover of darkness, and was on the soil of his native Virginia, with eight batteries under Pendleton on the river-bluffs, menacing pursuers. That evening Sept. 19, 1862. at dusk General Porter ordered General Griffin, with his own and Barnes's brigade, to cross the Potomac to carry Lee's batteries. It was done, and four of their guns were captured. On the following morning, Sept. 20. a part of Porter's division made a reconnoissance in force. When a mile from the ford they were surprised by A. P. Hill, who lay in ambush, and they were driven back into and across the river in great disorder, with the loss of two hundred men made prisoners. The Confederates held the Virginia bank of the stream all that day, and on the next, L
onfusion by our outposts. I shall change mine this evening, and hope to have better men in place. Col. Wirt Adams has just reported to me, and been sent to my front on both roads to develop the enemy. You shall know of him soon. Yours, truly, Braxton Bragg. [Inclosure.]May 4, 1862. General Cleburne: General: I threw out half of my regiment as skirmishers this morning in the direction of Farmington, so as to be ready for the enemy in case he advanced. I saw nothing of him. Captain Barnes, of Wirt Adams' cavalry, fell back into my lines about 11 o'clock last night. He sent out a reconnoitering party 1 mile beyond my pickets this morning. He saw no signs of the enemy. My pickets have seen no signs of him since yesterday evening. I am, however, still on the lookout, having strong guards in my front. He can hardly surprise me. Respectfully, your obedient servant, John E. Murray, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding. May 4, 1862--1.30 p. m. General Beauregard: dear Ge
00; and Lawton's brigade lost 554 out of 1,150. Among the Rebel killed were Maj.-Gen. Starke, of Miss., Brig.-Gens. L. O'B. Branch, of N. C., and G. B. Anderson; Cols. Douglass (commanding Lawton's brigade), Liddell, 11th Miss., Tew, 2d N. C., Barnes, 12th S. C., Mulligan, 15th Ga., Barclay, 23d do., and Smith, 27th do. Among their wounded were Maj.-Gen. R. H. Anderson, Brig.-Gens. Lawton, Rhodes, Ripley, Armistead, Gregg, of S. C., R. Toombs and Wright, of Ga. Lee, of course, did not care00 of his desperately wounded. Lee having posted 8 batteries on the Virginia bluffs of the Potomac, supported by 600 infantry under Pendleton, to cover his crossing, Gen. Porter, at dark, Sept. 19. sent across Gen. Griffin, with his own and Barnes's brigades, to carry them. This was gallantly done, under the fire of those batteries, and 4 guns taken; but a reconnoissance in force, made by part of Porter's division next morning Sept. 20. was ambushed by A. P. Hill, a mile from the ford,
, 23d Ga., killed at Antietam, 210. Barksdale, Gen. Wm., at Fredericksburg, 345; at Chancellorsville, 363; killed at Gettysburg, 388. Barlow, Gen. Francis C., distinguishes himself at Antietam, 208; wounded at Gettysburg, 388; at the Wilderness, 567 to 571; his assault near Richmond, 591. Barnard, Gen. J. G., his remarks on McClellan's failure, 107; extract from his report, on McClellan's delay at Yorktown, 122; on McClellan's failure to improve the opportunity at Fair Oaks, 147. Barnes, Col., 12th S. C.. killed at Antietam, 210. Barrett, Col., attacked by Gen. Slaughter, at Brazos, 757. Bartlett, Gen., at Gaines's Mill, 436. Barton, Col., 3d N. H., at Fort Wagner, 477. Batesville, Ark., Marmaduke defeated at, 447. Baton Rouge, La., occupied by Admiral Farragut, 101; Breckinridge defeated at, 102. battles-- Antietam, Md., 205. Arkansas Post, 292. Atlanta, Ga., 637. Averysboroa, N. C., 706. Baton Rouge, La., 103. Bentonville, N. C., 707. Bristow
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