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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 9 5 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 7 1 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for John S. Barnes or search for John S. Barnes in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
nspire the same admiration, affection, and trust that the officers who came in contact with Admiral Du Pont felt for him. The Montauk, Captain John L. Worden, was the first monitor to arrive, and as months would pass before all the others could be expected, Admiral Du Pont, on the 1st of February, 1863, sent that officer in the Montauk, supported by the gun-boats Wissahickon, Lieutenant-Commander John Lee Davis; the Seneca, Lieutenant-Commander William Gibson; and the Dawn, Lieutenant-Commander John S. Barnes, to try her powers against the earth-works of Fort McAllister, on the Ogeechee River, behind which the Confederate steamer Nashville was waiting for an opportunity to sail, on a cruise of pillage and destruction, against our ships of commerce upon the high seas. On the 28th of February, 1863, Captain Worden was so fortunate as to find the Nashville, aground, near Fort McAllister, and to approach within twelve hundred yards of her. He was able to set her on fire and destroy
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.7 (search)
Parrott, 1 9-inch, 2 9-inch pivot, 4 24-pounder S. B. howitzers; Conemaugh, Com. Reed Werden, 1 100-pounder Parrott pivot, 4 9-inch, 2 24-pounder S. B. howitzers, 1 11-inch pivot; Paul Jones, Com. Charles Steedman; Com. A. C. Rhind; Lieut.-Com. E. P. Williams, 1 100-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 11-inch pivot, 4 9-inch, 1 2-pounder S. B. light. Purchased steamers. South Carolina, Com. J. J. Almy, 1 30-pounder Parrott, 1 24-pounder S. B. howitzer, 4 8-inch, 2 32-pounders; Dawn, Act. Lieut. John S. Barnes, Act. Master James Brown, 2 32-pounders, 1100-pounder Parrott, 1 20-pounder Parrott, 1 12-pounder howitzer; Mercedita, Com. H. S. Stellwagen; Quaker City, Com. J. M. Frailey; Commnodore McDonough, Lieut.-Com. George Bacon, 1 9-inch pivot, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 2 50-pounder ]Dahlgren rifles, 2 24-pounder S. B. howitzers; Potomska, Act. V.-Lieut. William Budd, 5 guns; E. B. Hale, Act. Lieut. E. Brodhead, 4 32-pounders, 130-pounder Parrott pivot; Lodona, Com. E. R. Colhoun, 1100-pounde