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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Samuel A. Barnes or search for Samuel A. Barnes in all documents.

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ski, leaving early on the morning of the third instant, and taking with me the Ninth Michigan infantry, Lieut.-Col. Parkhurst, and the Eighth Kentucky infantry, Col. Barnes. Upon reaching Wartrace, and finding that the Fourth Kentucky cavalry, Col. Smith, had been ordered to Shelbyville, I directed Col. Barnes to occupy that plaCol. Barnes to occupy that place with the Eighth Kentucky infantry, where it still remains. The Ninth Michigan moved on to Shelbyville, where it arrived at four P. M. Learning from scouts that the enemy was at Unionville, and moving northward, I telegraphed Col. Lester, of the Third Minnesota infantry, to place a strong guard at the bridges near Murfreesboro, and Colonel Barnes, of the Eighth Kentucky infantry, to adopt a similar precaution near Wartrace; and after bivouacking for the night on the Fayetteville road, near Shelbyville, proceeded to Murfreesboro at daybreak on the fourth instant, by railway, with the Ninth Michigan infantry, halting at the cross-roads, and throwing out sc
mpany I, Twelfth regiment New-York State militia. Col. Ford, though seriously indisposed, left his couch repeatedly to go upon the field. Capt. Russell, of the Maryland home brigade, who exchanged the pastorate of the Presbyterian church at Williamsport for his captaincy, displayed much fearlessness and courage, at one time mounting the breastworks in full view of the rebels, who were close upon it. Lieut. St. Clair, company B, Thirty-second Ohio, also exhibited much heroism. First Lieut. Samuel A. Barnes, of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New-York, showed so much coolness while endeavoring to rally his wavering companions, as to attract the attention of Col. Miles. Lieut.-Col. Downy, of the Third Maryland home brigade, was also complimented by the Colonel for his courage and skill in handling his troops. Corporal Chapman, of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New-York, brought down a rebel colonel. During the engagement, the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth unfortunately fired upon
mpany I, Twelfth regiment New-York State militia. Col. Ford, though seriously indisposed, left his couch repeatedly to go upon the field. Capt. Russell, of the Maryland home brigade, who exchanged the pastorate of the Presbyterian church at Williamsport for his captaincy, displayed much fearlessness and courage, at one time mounting the breastworks in full view of the rebels, who were close upon it. Lieut. St. Clair, company B, Thirty-second Ohio, also exhibited much heroism. First Lieut. Samuel A. Barnes, of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New-York, showed so much coolness while endeavoring to rally his wavering companions, as to attract the attention of Col. Miles. Lieut.-Col. Downy, of the Third Maryland home brigade, was also complimented by the Colonel for his courage and skill in handling his troops. Corporal Chapman, of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New-York, brought down a rebel colonel. During the engagement, the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth unfortunately fired upon