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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Sydney M. Barnes or search for Sydney M. Barnes in all documents.

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f the One Hundred and Fifteenth Illinois. This duty was well performed. Six regiments, (the Eighth Kentucky, Colonel Sydney M. Barnes; the Ninety-sixth Illinois, Colonel Thomas E. Champion; the Thirty-fifth Indiana, Colonel Mullen; the Fortieth Oon in the cliff some three or four thousand yards to our rear on the west side of the mountain. The Eighth Kentucky, Colonel Barnes, was halted on the crest of the ridge with orders to deploy skirmishers to drive the enemy back, and to hold the cresKentucky. It has been most honorably borne. These men were quickly followed by the Eighth Kentucky infantry, led by Colonel Barnes, who was reenforced late in the day by the Ninety-sixth Illinois, Colonel Champion leading. They were directed to honitions of war, with the tents of a large encampment, fell into our hands. For particulars, I refer to the report of Colonel Barnes, who took them in charge. The number of prisoners taken by this command on Lookout is about six hundred, (600.) They
and stern fortitude that defied their utmost efforts. An alarming incident, however, occurred. Barnes's division, of the Fifth corps, suddenly gave way; and Sickles, seeing this, put a battery in po check the enemy if he broke through this gap on our front, and General Birney was sent to order Barnes back into line. No, he said; impossible. It is too hot. My men cannot stand it. Remonstrance the head of his brigade, (Second corps,) and this gallant officer instantly volunteered to take Barnes's place. When they reached the ground, Barnes's disordered troops impeded the advance of the brBarnes's disordered troops impeded the advance of the brigade. If you can't get out of the way, cried Zook, lie down and I will march over you. Barnes ordered his men to lie down, and the chivalric Zook and his splendid brigade, under the personal directBarnes ordered his men to lie down, and the chivalric Zook and his splendid brigade, under the personal direction of General Birney, did march over them right into the breach. Alas! poor Zook soon fell, mortally wounded, and half of his brigade perished with him. It was about this time — near seven P. M.--th
e fired on and prisoners taken before the flag could possibly have reached its destination. Moreover, I am informed by Adjutant Taylor that when he went to meet the flag, with his white handker-chief waving, he was fired upon, and had to retreat. Thus the battle opened, leaving non-combatants, women, and children to make their escape through the rain of shot and shell, which had been provoked by this strange and untimely attack. Our forces consisted of the Sixteenth Kentucky cavalry, Major Barnes, two hundred and seventy; three companies of the One Hundred and Twenty-second Illinois infantry, Major Chapman, one hundred and two; and the first Kentucky heavy artillery, (corps d'a frique,) Colonel Cunningham, two hundred and seventy-four; total, six hundred and forty-six. These were under the command of the war-worn veteran Colonel S. G. Hicks, who was severely wounded at the battle of Shiloh. The force of the rebels is believed to have consisted of three brigades, under command