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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 19: Chancellorsville. (search)
uld not be immediately brought to him, he said to Captain Wilbourne, Then I wish you to get me a skilful surgeon. On the arrival of General Hill, the anxious inquiry was made of him, where a surgeon could be most quickly found. He stated that Dr. Barr, an assistant surgeon in one of the regiments of Pender, which had just come to the front, was near at hand; and this gentleman being called, promptly answered. General Jackson now repeated in a whisper, to General Hill, the question: Is he a surgeon? He answered in substance, that he stood high in his brigade; and that at most, he did not propose to have him do anything until Dr. McGuire arrived, save the necessary precautionary acts. To this General Jackson replied: Very good; and Dr. Barr speedily procured a tourniquet to apply above the wound: but finding the blood no longer flowing, postponed its application. When General Jackson's field-glass and haversack were removed, they were preserved by Captain Wilbourne. The latter wa
hill. I then returned and rejoined my battalion, now under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Foy, Twenty-third Kentucky. The regiment behaved most nobly, both officers and men. They all took example from our noble Colonel, who fell before the action was over. They vied with each other in deeds of heroism. I would respectfully recommend to your favorable consideration Captains Trapp, Hooker, Jones, and Patterson; Lieutenants Leonard, Thomas, Varian, Groves, Ward, Kuhlman, and Young; also Doctor Barr. They are efficient officers, and deserve the highest encomiums for their noble conduct. Lieutenant Wollenhaupt, who was killed while gallantly urging his men forward, was a good officer and beloved by all. His loss is severely felt in the regiment. The loss in the regiment was heavy--one officer and eleven men killed, four officers and sixty-two men wounded, making the loss in the regiment since the twenty-third as follows: Officers — killed, one; wounded, four: men — killed, eleven
ow my prayers have been answered, for you were driven back when you tried to cross, and you have come back faster than you went. Another, seeing some men who had beet manning the battery walking behind the artillery, and supposing that because they had no muskets they had been thrown away to aid them in their flight, cried out, Where's your guns? The next time you hear them they will be turned against you, etc. The following is a list of our loss as far as I could collect it up to the time for the train to leave for Norfolk: Killed--Lieut. John Robinson, Sixth Massachusetts; Lieut. Barr, company I, Sixth Massachusetts; one of the Eleventh Pennsylvania cavalry. Wounded — A sergeant of the Mounted Rifles private McFarland, Thirteenth Indiana, leg shot off, mortally; private Hinton, company F, Thirteenth Indiana; private Brady, company C, Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania, in the leg, by a shell; private Cox, company C, Fifty-eighth Pennsyvania, in the leg, by a shell. --N. Y. Heral
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The wounding of Stonewall Jackson — extracts from a letter of Major Benjamin Watkins Leigh. (search)
General Hill had sent me for a surgeon and an ambulance for General Jackson, and he said there was an Assistant Surgeon--Dr. Barr--with his command; he called for Dr. Barr, and that gentleman speedily appeared. Dr. Barr said there was no ambulance wDr. Barr, and that gentleman speedily appeared. Dr. Barr said there was no ambulance within a mile of the place, but that he had a litter with him. I hastened with Dr. Barr and the litter-bearers back to where I had left General Jackson, and I also carried with me Captain Smith, General Jackson's Aid-de-Camp, who had ridden up inquiriDr. Barr said there was no ambulance within a mile of the place, but that he had a litter with him. I hastened with Dr. Barr and the litter-bearers back to where I had left General Jackson, and I also carried with me Captain Smith, General Jackson's Aid-de-Camp, who had ridden up inquiring for the General. We had been with the General but a short time, when the enemy's battery again commenced to fire upon us. * * General Jackson rose and walked a few yards leaning on my arm. His left arm had been broken above the elbow, and a baDr. Barr and the litter-bearers back to where I had left General Jackson, and I also carried with me Captain Smith, General Jackson's Aid-de-Camp, who had ridden up inquiring for the General. We had been with the General but a short time, when the enemy's battery again commenced to fire upon us. * * General Jackson rose and walked a few yards leaning on my arm. His left arm had been broken above the elbow, and a ball had passed through his right hand. * * * We had not gone far when he laid down on the litter and we took it up and were carrying him along, when the cannonade became so terrific that the two litter-carriers abandoned the litter, leaving no one
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson — the story of his being an Astrologer refuted — an eye-witness describes how he was wounded. (search)
When General Hill came to me, he allowed only one of his escort to dismount and accompany him, viz: Major Leigh, who, I believe, was then called Captain Leigh, and he ordered the rest to remain on their horses in the pike. He sent at once for Dr. Barr, who promptly came up, just as I had finished binding General Jackson's wounds and putting his arm in a sling. General Jackson was evidently greatly astonished, and did not seem to understand why or how the troops should have fired on us. As ral Jackson, and I suppose their account of what occurred in this interval is correctly given by Dr. Dabney, to whom each of them sent an account. I will state that when General Hill offered General Jackson whiskey, as soon as or about the time Dr. Barr came up, he at first refused it, or hesitated; but when I told him it was absolutely necessary for him and would revive and sustain him until we could get him safely back to the rear, he then very reluctantly drank a little. As he saw that it r
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), George (William Frederick) 1737-1820 (search)
ed by the traitorous correspondence, counsels, and comfort of divers wicked and desperate persons within our realm, and he called upon all officers of the realm, civil and military, and all his subjects, to disclose all traitorous conspiracies, giving information of the same to one of the secretaries of state, in order to bring to condign punishment the authors, perpetrators, and abettors of such traitorous designs. This proclamation was aimed at Chatham and Camden in the House of Lords, and Barr6 in the House of Commons, and their active political friends. When it was read to the people at the Royal Exchange it was received with a general hiss from the populace. But the stubborn King would not yield. He would rather perish than consent to repeal the alterations in the charter of Massachusetts, or yield the absolute authority of Parliament. And North, who in his heart thought the King wrong, supported him chiefly, as was alleged, because he loved office with its power and emolumen
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 96 Enlisted men by disease. Total 130. Independent Battalion Cavalry Organized at Pittsburg, Pa., June and July, 1863. Mustered out December 29, 1863. Ringgold Battalion Cavalry Organized in the field September, 1862, by consolidation of Keys' Washington (Pa.) Cavalry Company, organized at Washington, Pa., June 29, 1861; Work's Washington County Company, organized September 6, 1862; Young's Cavalry, organized September 6, 1862; Barr's Cavalry Company, organized October 13, 1862, and Chessrown's Cavalry Company, organized October 14, 1862. Attached to Railroad District, 8th Corps, Middle Dept., to January, 1863. Romney, W. Va., Defenses Upper Potomac, 8th Corps, Middle Dept., to March, 1863. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, 8th Corps, to June, 1863. Campbell's Brigade, Scammon's Division, Dept. West Virginia, to December, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, West Virginia, to February, 1864. Service. Guard and
nch Church; but no hostile force was met. Nov. 17.—The third expedition into the rebel neighborhood began; a slight skirmish took place, but the artillery soon drove the enemy. Dec. 5.—A new company-ground was occupied on the front; it received the name of Camp Misery, but it was soon so improved that it became healthy and pleasant. On the 11th, a large force, including the Sixth, was sent to a ford of the Blackwater, to rout a rebel force. The regiment lost a gallant officer,—Lieutenant Barr, of Company I, Lawrence, who was shot through the heart. At midnight, Jan. 29, the regiment fell in, under General Corcoran, a part of a force of four thousand three hundred men, and marched towards Blackwater; the Sixth supporting our Seventh battery, who were under fire for the first time. The position of the regiment was on the edge of a swamp, and was very exposed. The engagement lasted two hours under close range,—eight hundred yards. The day following, another engagement occ
rd to the farthest point reached by our troops during the battle. When the regiment had commenced the delivery of its fire about forty rods from the position of the rebel infantry, a shell was thrown, with fatal accuracy, at the colors, which again brought them to the ground wet with the life-blood of the brave Plunkett, both of whose arms were carried away. Color-Corporal Olney of Company H immediately raised the glorious flag and defiantly bore it through the remainder of the day. Color-Corporal Barr of Company C, who carried the State colors, was also shot, and his post of honor and danger quickly taken by Color-Corporal Wheeler of Company I. Color-Corporal Miller was also wounded. Of the 28th Mass. Infantry (Col. Richard Byrnes), which had, after the 20th, the largest list of killed and mortally wounded at Fredericksburg (thirty-six), General Meagher, its brigade commander, says in his report: It is a substantial and splendid addition to the Irish Brigade. . . . It has sinew,
. G. Martin had been recalled from the Virginia army and placed in command of the Western department of North Carolina, with headquarters at Asheville. Under his command were, according to Martin's return, March 10th, the following troops: Col. J. B. Palmer's brigade, embracing the Sixty-second, Sixty-fourth and Sixty-ninth (?) North Carolina regiments; Macbeth's light artillery; Erwin's battalion of Senior reserves; Thomas' legion (Love's regiment), McKamy's battalion, Indian battalion, and Barr's battery—a total force of 2,910. It is not clear why in this report General Martin seems to count one regiment twice. These regiments of active, hardy mountaineers were mainly employed in repelling the numerous raids through the mountains by Federal mixed forces, and in meeting detachments from Col. George W. Kirk's notorious regiment of Union North Carolinians. This regiment was a constant menace to that section and was restlessly energetic. In July, 1864, it surprised and captured Ca
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