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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The wounding of Stonewall Jackson — extracts from a letter of Major Benjamin Watkins Leigh. (search)
General Hill had sent me for a surgeon and an ambulance for General Jackson, and he said there was an Assistant Surgeon--Dr. Barr--with his command; he called for Dr. Barr, and that gentleman speedily appeared. Dr. Barr said there was no ambulance wDr. Barr, and that gentleman speedily appeared. Dr. Barr said there was no ambulance within a mile of the place, but that he had a litter with him. I hastened with Dr. Barr and the litter-bearers back to where I had left General Jackson, and I also carried with me Captain Smith, General Jackson's Aid-de-Camp, who had ridden up inquiriDr. Barr said there was no ambulance within a mile of the place, but that he had a litter with him. I hastened with Dr. Barr and the litter-bearers back to where I had left General Jackson, and I also carried with me Captain Smith, General Jackson's Aid-de-Camp, who had ridden up inquiring for the General. We had been with the General but a short time, when the enemy's battery again commenced to fire upon us. * * General Jackson rose and walked a few yards leaning on my arm. His left arm had been broken above the elbow, and a baDr. Barr and the litter-bearers back to where I had left General Jackson, and I also carried with me Captain Smith, General Jackson's Aid-de-Camp, who had ridden up inquiring for the General. We had been with the General but a short time, when the enemy's battery again commenced to fire upon us. * * General Jackson rose and walked a few yards leaning on my arm. His left arm had been broken above the elbow, and a ball had passed through his right hand. * * * We had not gone far when he laid down on the litter and we took it up and were carrying him along, when the cannonade became so terrific that the two litter-carriers abandoned the litter, leaving no one
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson — the story of his being an Astrologer refuted — an eye-witness describes how he was wounded. (search)
When General Hill came to me, he allowed only one of his escort to dismount and accompany him, viz: Major Leigh, who, I believe, was then called Captain Leigh, and he ordered the rest to remain on their horses in the pike. He sent at once for Dr. Barr, who promptly came up, just as I had finished binding General Jackson's wounds and putting his arm in a sling. General Jackson was evidently greatly astonished, and did not seem to understand why or how the troops should have fired on us. As ral Jackson, and I suppose their account of what occurred in this interval is correctly given by Dr. Dabney, to whom each of them sent an account. I will state that when General Hill offered General Jackson whiskey, as soon as or about the time Dr. Barr came up, he at first refused it, or hesitated; but when I told him it was absolutely necessary for him and would revive and sustain him until we could get him safely back to the rear, he then very reluctantly drank a little. As he saw that it r