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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
ser. Seventh Virginia, Colonel R. H. Dulany. Eleventh Virginia, Colonel O. R. Funsten. Twelfth Virginia, Colonel A. W. Harman. Thirty-fifth Virginia Battalion, Lieut.-Colonel E. V. White. Lee's division. Major-General W. H. F. Lee. Barringer's brigade. Brigadier-General Rufus Barringer. First North Carolina, Colonel W. H. Cheek. Second N. C., Col. C. M. Andrews´╝ł On the original of this; was killed June 23, 1864.) [Col. W. P. Roberts]. Fourth North Carolina, Colonel D. D. FBrigadier-General Rufus Barringer. First North Carolina, Colonel W. H. Cheek. Second N. C., Col. C. M. Andrews´╝ł On the original of this; was killed June 23, 1864.) [Col. W. P. Roberts]. Fourth North Carolina, Colonel D. D. Ferebee. Fifth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel S. B. Evans. Chambliss's brigade. Brigadier-General J. R. Chambliss, Jr. Ninth Virginia, Colonel R. L. T. Beale. Tenth Virginia, Colonel J. Lucius Davis. Thirteenth Virginia, Colonel J. C. Phillips. Artillery. but one General officer reported for duty in the Artillery, and Alexander's name not on original. Brigadier-General W. N. Pendleton Commanding. First corps Artillery. Brigadier-General E. P. Alexander.( On the or
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Fitzhugh Lee of the operations of the cavalry corps A. N. V. (search)
th Carolina brigade of W. H. F. Lee's division suffered severely. The troops had been placed in motion again to resume the march. This brigade was the rear of the column, and I was obliged to retain it in position to prevent the enemy from attacking the remainder of the command. Whilst getting in motion, their rapidly arriving forces soon augmented the troops it was so gallantly holding in check, and produced a concentration impossible for it to resist. Its commander, BrigadierGene-ral Barringer, was captured whilst in the steady discharge of his duties, and his loss was keenly felt by the command. I also had the great misfortune to be deprived of the services of my most efficient and untiring Adjutant-General, Major J. Dugin Fergusson, who was captured about the same time, and whose assistance, always important, was especially desirable at this time. Reporting to the Commanding General at Amelia C. H. on the 5th, I was ordered to move with my command on the Paynesville road t