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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
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Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America., III: a word more about America. (search)
an, the ideas and morals are not republican. In America not only are the institutions republican, but the ideas and morals are pre; vailingly republican also. They are those of a plain, decent middle class. The ideal of those who are the public instructors of the people is the ideal of such a class. In France the ideal of the mass of popular journalists and popular writers of fiction, who are now practically the public instructors there, is, if you could see their hearts, a Pompadour or du Barry regime, with themselves for the part of Faublas. With this ideal prevailing, this vision of the objects for which wealth is desirable, the possessors of wealth become hateful to the multitude which toils and endures, and society is undermined. This is one of the many inconveniences which the French have to suffer from that worship of the great goddess Lubricity to which they are at present vowed. Wealth excites the most savage enmity there, because it is conceived as a means for gratifyi
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
s interest as a manager prompting his ability as a writer; we find his genius as a trainer of stars like Mrs. Leslie Carter, Blanche Bates, David Warfield, and Frances Starr regulating his selection of subjects for treatment as playwright. The advance from The heart of Maryland (22 October, 1895) to the adaptation of Zaza (8 January, 1899) represented his discovery of increasing ability in the emotionalism of Mrs. Carter; and his successive presentation of her in such spectacular dramas as Du Barry (25 December, 1901) and Adrea (11 January, 1905) measured his belief in her histrionic power. In the same way, his faith in Blanche Bates prompted him to write many scenes in Madame Butterfly (5 March, 1900), The Darling of the gods (3 December, 1902), and The girl of the Golden West (14 November, 1905) for her. Taking Warfield from the Weber and Fields organization (a combination which produced about 1897-1900, by their burlesque of current American successes, a type of humour truly Arist
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
rways, 165 Down in the West branch, 162 Doyle, Conan, 316 Drannan, W. F., 153 Draper, J. W., 180, 181, 236 Draper, L. C., 173 Dream (Byron), 369 Dream-doomed, 56 Dream life, 110, 111, 112, 113 Dred; a tale of the great dismal Swamp, 71 Dreiser, Theodore, 298 Drescher, Martin, 581, 583 Dresel, J., 581 Dresser, Horatio, 240 n. Drew, Mrs., John, 270 Drisler, Henry, 461 Driver, Professor, 207 Drowsy Sleeper, the, 511 Drummond, Judge, 151 Drum-Taps, 269 Du Barry, 281 Du Bellay, 458 Ducange, 461 Du Chaillu, Paul B., 163 Ducs de Bourgogne, 598 Duden, 578 Dugue, Oscar, 592, 596 Duhring, 436 Dumas, 269 Du Maurier, 379 Dunbar, C. F., 440 Dunciad, 487 Dunlap, 270, 272, 487 Dunne, F. P., 26, 29-30, 289, 290 Dunscombe, 438 DuPonceau, Peter Stephen, 448, 451 Durant, 526 D'Urville, 135 Dutch and Quaker colonies, the, 193 Dutton, C. E., 159 Duvallon, Berquin, 591 Dwight, Timothy, 86, 432, 461, 471,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Signal Corps in the Confederate States army. (search)
fficer at Charleston, show that during the siege thousands of messages were sent from one post to another, and from outposts to headquarters, most of which could have been sent in no other way, and many were of great importance. It is hoped that the length of the following extracts from Captain Markoe's reports will be excused by their interest: During the month (July, 1863,) my corps has been at work day and night. At Cummins Point (Battery Gregg) Lance Sergeant Edgerton and Privates Du Barry, Lance, Huger, Martin and Grimball have gallantly worked their post with untiring zeal and ability, constantly under heavy fire of the enemy's fleet and land batteries. Fortunately, I have no casualties to report, although their station has suffered from the enemy's fire and is full of holes. As there was no other means of communication with Morris Island, their labors have been very heavy. They have sent over five hundred messages, and at least a third of them under fire. As they
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
. W., 144. Dickinson, Capt., Geo. C., 68. Dickson, Rev. A. F., 166, 173, 176. Dimitry, Prof., Alex., 418. Discipline in the Union army, 56; in the Confederate, 69. Diuguid, Lt. John W., 232. Doby, Lt., 389. Dodson, Lt. W. G., 58, 61, 62. Doggett, Lt. J. L., 92. Dottera, W. A., 262. Dougherty, Gen., 61. Douthat, Capt. H. C., 60, 65, 66; Battery, 61. Dowdall, Theodore. 63. Dranesville, Battle of, 16. Drayton, Gen., 393. Drewry's Bluff, 190; engagement at, 193, 408. Du Barry, 104. Dublin, Va., 67. Du Bose, Gen., 406. Dubroca, Capt., 303. Dudley, Major, Thos. U., 65. Due or Dew, Lt. V, 187, 192. Duel of Waggaman and Prieur, 447. Duke, Gen. Basil, 59,. 61, 62, 64, 65. Dukes, Robert E., 161. Dukes, W. D., 129 Duncan, D. D., Rev. J. A., 205. Dunlop, Senator, 322. Dunlop, Capt. W. S, 21. Dunnavant, Col. R. G. M., 18. Dunn's Hill, Va., 265. Dutch Gap, Va., 261. Duvall, Lt., Eli, 92. Dwight, Lt., 388. Earle, Col. Wm. E., 418. Early, G
Osgood, IX., 236. Droop Mountain, Va., II., 346. Drum, R. C.: suggests return of Confederate battle-flags, IX., 36. Drumgould's Bluff, Miss., VI., 207, 316. Drummer Boys N. Y. Eighth Reg., VIII., 179; in full dress, VIII., 195; off duty, VIII., 195, 237; Confederate, VIII., 383. Drum-taps, Walt Whitman, IX., 21, 254. Dry Forks, Mo. (see also Carthage, Mo.), I, 348. Dry Wood, Mo., I., 350. Dryer, H., IV., 231. Duane, J. C., V., 240. Du Barry, W. D., VII., 125. Dubois, D. M., X., 265. Ducat, A. C., X., 19. Duck River, Tenn., VI., 69, 318. Duff, W., X., 49. Duff, W. L., IX., 113. Duffie, A. N.: II., 25; III., 324, 326; IV., 88, 177, 226, 233 seq., 224. Dug Springs, Mo., I., 350, 367. Dugan, Jimmine, a bugler boy, VIII., 189. Duganne, A. J. H., VII., 96. Duke, B. W.: II., 326; IV., 144, 148, 150; VII., 21; quoted, IX., 346. Dulany, R. H., IV., 104. Dumfries, Va.,
at time, the Catholic king was fully employed in personally regulating his finances, and in preparations to chastise the pirates of Algiers, as well as to extort from Portugal a renunciation of its claims to extend the boundaries of Brazil. The sovereign of France was engrossed by the pressing anxieties attending the dismissal of an odious ministry, and the inauguration of domestic reform; so that neither of the princes seemed at leisure to foment troubles in North America. Yet, next to Du Barry and her party, there was no such sincere mourner for Louis the Fifteenth as George the Third. The continuance of the cordial understanding between the two crowns would depend upon the persons in whom the young king should place his confidence. To conciliate his good will, the Chap. I.} 1774. May. London Court Gazette announced him as king of France, though English official language had heretofore spoken only of the French king, and the Herald's office still knew no other king of France