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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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alley, and with them march to the rescue of our kinsmen in oppression and doubt. Soldiers, it is the hour for immortality or obloquy. The will of the veteran is sustained by Omnipotence, and the blood of the martyr shall nourish the Bay Tree of Liberty. Who falters, sides with the foe — who disdains odds carves his own escutcheon, which fame shall ponder and memory treasure. Soldiers, we challenge you once more to the field. Through the earnest solicitation of many Marylanders, Captain Edmund Barry has accepted an appointment to lead you back to your homes. Marylanders, will you go? Or shall the hollow query be made, Where were they? Sons of Revolutionary sires! the Goddess of History is vigilant, and notes the actions of the solemn hour! Be men, and abide the issue. Our leader is grown grey in the clatter of arms, and is eager to offer his last, best tribute as a bequest to his posterity. Marylanders, will you stand by him? Soldiers, will you die with us, for our righ
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3.22 (search)
ay the last one was mustered out, a new company entered the regiment, and was designated company C. It was understood that Captain Murray, would raise a company as soon as possible, and renter the regiment, and in this view Colonel Johnson reserved the reenlisted men of company H, fourteen in number, for his new company. He had reason then to look forward to eight companies in a short time, seven of them being together and in service. Company C was organized by the election of Captain, Edmund Barry; First Lieutenant, J. P. Marshall; Second Lieutenants, W. H. H. Edelin and John T. Smith. Two or three days after this, while everything was going on encouragingly, recruits coming in and every prospect of success, Colonel Johnson met General Jackson in the street, both riding. Colonel, received the order? said he, in his crisp way. No, sir, said the Colonel. Want you to march. When sir? Now! Which way? Get in the cars, go with Lawton. How must I send my train, and the battery?
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), chapter 11 (search)
Sullivan. Sergeants, McHenry Howard, James Lyon, Chapman B. Briscoe. Corporals, Edward Johnson, Richard C. Mackall, Clapham Murray, Wm. S. Lemmon. Company I—Captain, Michael S. Robertson. FirstLieu-tenant, Hugh Mitchell. Second-Lieutenant, Hezekiah H. Bean, Eugene Diggs. First-Sergeant, John J. Brawner. Sergeants, John H. Stone, F. L. Higdon, Wm. H. Rison, Warren W. Ward. Corporals, Z. Francis Freeman, Francis L. Higdon, Thomas I. Green, Thomas L. Hannon. Company C (Second)—Captain, Edmund Barry. First-Lieutenant, John Marshall. Second-Lieutenant, Wm. H. Edelin, Tom Washington Smith. First-Sergeant, Albert Tolson. Sergeants, Richard Brown, William Barry. (This company was enlisted in Richmond and united with the regiment. No muster roll of this company has been found in the war records.) Battles and actions in which the First Maryland infantry was engaged: Manassas, Mason's Hill, Munson's Hill, Rappahannock River, Front Royal, Winchester, Harrisonburg, Cross Keys, Me<