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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville. (search)
lonels Avery and Haywood, Lieutenant-Colonels George and Ashcraft, and Major Davidson in the charge Sunday morning. After the loss of so many field officers, Major Barry and Captains Harris, Saunders, Brown and Nicholson, rendered me grent assistance. Captain Saunders, in his official report, calls special attention to the effight by my command. I did not advance, but went to the plank-road, where I learned that General Hill had also been wounded. I then, moreover, learned from Colonel John D. Barry, then major of the Eighteenth North Carolina regiment, that he knew nothing of Generals Jackson and Hill having gone to the front; that he could not tell fregiment not only wounded Generals Jackson and Hill, but killed some of their couriers and perhaps some of their staff-officers, as some of them were missing. Colonel Barry, who was one of my bravest and most accomplished officers always thought that Generals Jackson and Hill were both wounded by his command. After the wounding
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
the infantry had fallen behind their second and third lines of defence, when the division advancing in an oblique direction, the extreme right of which had reached the works, was compelled to fall back, the troops on the right having already gone, exposing the line to a very deadly fire from that direction immediately on the flank, and a large column of infantry appearing on the left, that flank also became exposed. The two extreme left regiments of Lane's brigade, under Colonels Avery and Barry, advanced some minutes after the rest of the line had given way, and fell back under direct orders. The gallantry and impetuosity of the brigades of the division engaged in this attack drew from their veteran and wounded commander the highest compliments, as it won the admiration of all who witnessed them. Lane's veteran troops advanced with that enthusiasm and firmness which had characterized them on every field which has made the soil of Virginia historic, under the immediate supervi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
C. T. Haigh, Company B, Thirty-seventh regiment; Lieutenant B. A. Johnston, Company C, Thirty-seventh regiment. Than these none were more attentive to duty — none more upright in their conduct — none more gallant on the battle field. Colonel John D. Barry, of the Eighteenth regiment, and Colonel W. H. A. Speer, of the Twenty-eighth, behaved with great coolness in withdrawing their commands while attacked in the morning, and in the flank movement that afternoon seemed determined to offset t of the Court-house. Here we turned to the left, marched beyond the works, and formed the Thirty-third, Twenty-eighth, and Thirty-seventh regiments in line of battle in the woods to the left of a small road; the Seventh and Eighteenth, under Colonel Barry, being formed in rear as a support. In obedience to orders, we then advanced through an almost impenetrable abattis, dislodged and drove back a strong line of the enemy's skirmishers, and held their main line of breastworks until after dark,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
in to sever those ties — to take to my heart the thought that I am no longer of you. My constant prayer will be may God protect and bless you all; and my heart will be with you in the future, rejoicing at every brave deed done and at every new laurel won, full of earnest sympathy with all your fortunes whether good or ill. Please remember me most particularly to my brother officers of the staff, the officers of Company G, Colonels Lowe, Speer, and Major Stowe; Colonels Avery, Barbour, and Barry--in a word all of my personal friends. If God should ever give me strength to take the field again, you may expect to see me somewhere in the old 4th, if it be in the ranks with a musket on my shoulder. Yours most truly, Geo. B. Johnston. The next and last assistant Adjutant-General was Captain E. J. Hale, Jr., of Fayettville, N. C. He entered the service as a private in Company F, First North Carolina Volunteers ( Bethel regiment ), and was adjutant of the Fifty-Sixth North Carol
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 5.44 (search)
charge of it on the field and continued in command until the close of the war. When I was wounded, in the summer of 1864, it was temporarily commanded by Colonels John D. Barry and W. H. A. Speers, and Brigadier-General Conner. General Branch entered the service as Quartermaster-General of North Carolina, was appointed Colonel White, Alfred W. Wiseman, J. R. Fraley. Chaplain: M. M. Marshall. Eighteenth regiment. Colonels: James D. Radcliffe, Robert H. Cowan, Thomas J. Purdie, John D. Barry. Lieutenant-Colonels: O. P. Meares, Thomas J. Purdie, Forney George, John W. McGill. Majors: George Tait, Forney George, R. M. DeVane, John D. Barry, ThoJohn D. Barry, Thomas J. Wooten. Adjutants: Charles D. Myers, Samuel B. Walters, William H. McLaurin. Quartermaster: A. D. Cazaux. Commissaries: Duncan McNeil, Robert Tait. Surgeons: James A. Miller, John Tazwell Tyler, Thomas B. Lane. Assistant-Surgeons: Charles Lecesne, William Brower, Alexander Gordon, Simpson Russ. Chaplain: C
. A. M. Scales Promoted Brigadier-General. 14thNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. R. T. Bennett   Col. W. P. Roberts Promoted Brigadier-General. 15thNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. Wm. McRaeFeb. 27, 1863.Promoted Brigadier-General. Col. Henry A. Dowd   16thNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. John S. McElroyJune 1, 1862.  Lt. Col. Wm. A. StoweMay 31, 1862.  Col. Stephen Lee   17thNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. Wm. F. MartinJuly 27, 1861.  18thNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. John D. BarryMay 3, 1863.  Col. Robt. H. Cowan   19thNorth CarolinaRegimentCavalryCol. Wm. G. RobinsonSept. 1, 1861.  20thNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. Nelson SloughJan. 14, 1863.  Col. Thomas F. ToonFeb. 26, 1863.Promoted Brigadier-General. Col. Alf. Iverson, Jr Promoted Brigadier-General. 21stNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. W. W. KirklandApril 21, 1863.Promoted Brigadier-General. 22dNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. James ConnorJune 13, 1862.  Col. Thos. S. Galloway,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of General John Bankhead Magruder. (search)
school entitled to a passing notice, both on account of their military reputation and social character. The great value of the artillery schools at Old Point and Leavenworth cannot be better be illustrated than by referring to some of the names which subsequent events have rendered distinguished, such as Bailey, Benson, and Grebble, who, in the brilliant display of their skill, were removed from the theatre of fame when honor was fast gathering about them, while there still remained Hunt, Barry, and some others, in the enjoyment of distinguished reputations. The light artillery of the United States before the Mexican war was held in but small estimation, but the brilliant service of the batteries of Magruder, Bragg and Duncan during that war raised it to a high degree of popularity, and subsequently, through the influence of the military academy at West Point and the artillery schools at Old Point and Leavenworth, the Federal and Confederate artillery of America acquired a chara
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph (search)
tle at Cold Harbor, but returned to my command about the last of August, to find a great many of my officers absent, on account of the numerous engagements and hard fighting in that campaign. The compilation of the War Records Office, is doubtless true, but it does not give the names of the real regimental commanders in my brigade at that time. They were as follows: Seventh North Carolina, Colonel William Lee Davidson. Do not know why he was absent. Eighteenth North Carolina, Colonel John D. Barry, who was absent, wounded in one of the numerous engagements on the north side of the James. Twenty-eighth North Carolina, Colonel William H. A. Speer, who was absent, mortally wounded at Reams's Station August 25th. Thirty-third North Carolina, Colonel R. V. Coward. I do not remember why he was absent. I know that he was with me in the battle of Jones's Farm, September 30th, and behaved with conspicuous gallantry on my right flank. Thirty-seventh North Carolina, Colonel Wil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
Scales, commissioned June 13, 1863. Among the staff appointments we find that the third Adjutant and Inspector General, R. C. Gatlin, was a son of this University. He was commissioned August 26, 1863, and in July 1862, had been made a Major-General of N. C. S. T. The first assistant Adjutant General, was J. F. Hoke (1861); the first Quartermaster General was L. O'B. Branch; the first Commissary General was Col. William Johnston. Matt. W. Ransom was made a Major-General in 1865 and Col. John D. Barry was commissioned a Brigadier-General, with temporary rank, on the third of August, 1864. In the medical department we find Dr. Peter E. Hines as the Medical Director of North Carolina troops, Dr. E. Burke Haywood as surgeon of the General Hospital at Raleigh, and Joseph H. Baker was the first assistant Surgeon of North Carolina troops, commissioned in 1861. Other alumni rendered similar services to other states; Ashley W. Spaight was Brigadier-General in the service of Texas; Thoma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lane's Corps of sharpshooters. (search)
Surgeons.—Wesley M. Campbell. Assistant Surgeons.—William Ed. White, Alfred W. Wiseman, J. R. Fraley. Chaplain.—M. M. Marshall. Eighteenth North Carolina Regiment. Colonels.—James D. Radcliffe, Robert H. Cowan, Thomas J. Purdie, John D. Barry. Lieutenant-Colonels.—O. P. Mears, Thomas J. Purdie, Forney George, John W. McGill. Majors.—George Tait, Forney George, R. M. DeVane, John D. Barry, Thomas J. Wooten. Adjutants.—Charles D. Myers, Samuel B. Walters, William H. McLauriJohn D. Barry, Thomas J. Wooten. Adjutants.—Charles D. Myers, Samuel B. Walters, William H. McLaurin. Quartermaster.—A. D. Cazaux. Commissaries.—Duncan McNeill, Robert Tait. Surgeons.—James A. Miller, John Tazwell Tyler, Thomas B. Lane. Assistant Surgeons.—Charles Lecesne, William Brower, Alexander Gordon, Simpson Russ. Chaplain.—Colin Shaw. Twenty-eighth North Carolina Regiment. Colonels.—James H. Lane, Sam D. Lowe. Lieutenant-Colonels.—Thomas L. Lowe, Sam D. Lowe, William D. Barringer, William H. A. Speer. Majors.—Richard E. Reeves, Sam
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