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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Confederate use of subterranean shells on the Peninsula. (search)
ons I saw a number of large shells, placed so that they could easily be fired by persons unaware of their presence. The Official Records show that General Fitz John Porter referred to the buried shells in his report of the siege, and General William F. Barry, Inspector of Artillery, made a statement in detail, in a communication to army headquarters, August 25th, 1863. Porter's statement is that when the advance detachments entered Yorktown the command on the left was fired upon from thsses from shells planted in the ground, which exploded when trod upon. Many of these shells were concealed in the streets and houses of the town, and arranged to explode by treading on the caps or pulling a wire attached to the doors. General W. F. Barry wrote that buried shells were encountered when they were about to enter the abandoned Confederate lines: Before reaching the glacis of the main work, and at the distance of more than one hundred yards from it, several of our men were i
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
credit to General Misunderstanding, who, in history, fights most battles. Parts of Hazzard's, Pettit's, and Osborn's batterries were engaged on the Union side. The Confederate infantry north of the railroad (Cobb's, Toombs's, and Anderson's brigades) did not take an active part in the battle. Anderson's brigade is not shown, its position being outside the northern bounds of the map. The Confederate artillery engaged comprised Kemper's battery, two guns of Hart's battery, and Lieutenant Barry's 32-pounder rifled gun mounted on a rail-car, and protected from cannon-shot by a sloping roof, in front, covered with plates of iron, through which a port-hole had been pierced. Editors. was over, our troops held the contested ground. Their behavior throughout the fight had been admirable. General E. M. Law says in the Southern bivouac for May, 1887: The battle of Savage's Station, although a drawn fight as far as the possession of the field was concerned, was practically a vic
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Washington under Banks. (search)
. Disorder reigned unchecked and confusion was everywhere. The clerks in the departments, many of whom had been hurried toward the front to do service as nurses, were now hastily formed into companies and battalions for defense; the Government ordered the arms and ammunition at the arsenal and the money in the Treasury to be shipped to New York, and the banks followed the example; a gun-boat, with steam up, lay in the river off the White House, as if to announce to the army and Major-General W. F. Barry, chief-of-artillery of the defenses of Washington, September 1, 1862, to March 1, 1864. from a photograph. the inhabitants the impending flight of the Administration. It was at this juncture that the President, on his own responsibility, once more charged General McClellan with the defense of the capital. The next day, the 3d of September, the President further confided to General Halleck General McClellan seems never to have known of this order.--R. B. I. the duty of prepa