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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 7 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
by the fire of her heavy battery. She passed on with severe punishment, and was immediately attacked by the most powerful vessel in the Confederate fleet, excepting the Louisiana--the ram Manassas, commanded by Lieutenant Warley, a gallant young officer of the old service. The blow that the Manassas struck the Brooklyn did but little apparent injury, Owing to the chain armor and to the full coal-bunker; but when the bunker was emptied later, the wound was found to be serious. See Commander Bartlett's article, page 56.--Editors. and the ram slid off in the dark to seek other prey. (It must be remembered that these scenes were being enacted on a dark night, and in an atmosphere filled with dense smoke, through which our commanders had to grope their way, guided only by the flashes of the guns in the forts and the fitful light of burning vessels and rafts.) Rear-Admiral Melancton Smith, at New Orleans in command of the Mississippi. drawn from a photograph. The Brooklyn was n
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Brooklyn at the passage of the forts. (search)
The Brooklyn at the passage of the forts. Commander John Russell Bartlett, U. S. N. Aspect of Fort Jackson in 1885. from the summit of the levee looking South from the River. From February 2d to March 7th, 1862, the United States steamer Brooklyn, Captain Thomas T. Craven, was engaged in blockading Pass a l'outre, one of tcables along each side, abreast of the engine and Section of chain armor placed on the side of the Brooklyn to protect her boilers. From a sketch lent by Commander Bartlett. boilers. A jack-stay, or iron rod, was fastened by means of eye-bolts to the ship's side about eight feet above the water, and one of the chain-cables in deck since midnight to see that everything about the deck and guns was The course of the Brooklyn in the passage of the forts. From a drawing lent by Commander J. R. Bartlett. B--Brooklyn, and course taken. H--Hartford aground. M--Manassas ramming the Brooklyn. ready for action, and when the decks were wet down and s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Fighting Farragut below New Orleans. (search)
clear of the cross-fire from the forts and not exposed to the broadsides of the enemy when passing them, while both guns of each ram could have raked the enemy for over a mile as they approached; they would have been out of the smoke, and would have had extra time to raise steam, to prepare to fire and to ram; moreover, they would have been at a great advantage in ramming, since the advancing vessels Map showing final disposition of the Confederate fleet. From a drawing lent by Commander J. R. Bartlett. 1.--The Governor Moore ramming the Varuna. 2.--The Stonewall Jackson ramming the Varuna. would have had to incline to the eastward on reaching them. Not one of them to my knowledge, nor was it ever reported, availed itself of one of these advantages, for when they saw the enemy approaching, those having steam tried to escape, whilst others that did not have it were set afire where they lay, as I myself witnessed. Not one of them made the feeblest offensive or defensive mov
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886 (search)
Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886 Author; born in Providence, R. I., Oct. 23, 1805. He was for six years cashier of the Globe Bank in Providence, and an active member of the Franklin Society for the Cultivation of Science. He was also one of the projectors of the Athenaeum in Providence, and for some time corresponding secretary of the New York Historical Society. Mr. Bartlett was associated with Albert Gallatin as a projector and founder of the American Ethnological Society. In 1850 he was appointed by President Taylor a commissioner, under the treaty of peace with Mexico in 1848, to settle the boundary-line between that country and the United Stae Island and Providence plantations, in, 10 volumes; also an Index to the acts and resolves of the General Assembly of Rhode Island from 1758 to 1862. In 1847 Mr. Bartlett published a little volume on the Progress of Ethnology; and in 1848 a Dictionary of Americanisms, since revised and enlarged. He also published a Bibliography
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Satterlee, Herbert Livingston 1863- (search)
Satterlee, Herbert Livingston 1863- Lawyer; born in New York, Oct. 31, 1863; graduated at Columbia College in 1883, and was admitted to the bar in 1885; was navigator of the New York naval battalion in 1891-95; captain of the naval militia in 1897-98; and during the war with Spain was lieutenant and chief of staff to Capt. John R. Bartlett, U. S. N. He is the author of Political history of the province of New York, etc.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
in a far-off country of irremediable disappointment. We know of the existence of but four copies of Reid's book. After the Gadsden Purchase the matter of the Mexican boundary was ready for determination. The work was under the direction of Major W. H. Emory, who made an excellent Report on the United States and Mexican boundary Survey (1857) in two fine volumes, the first two chapters of volume I containing a very interesting personal account. One of the boundary commissioners, John Russell Bartlett, published his own account in two volumes of Personal narrative of explorations and incidents in Texas, New Mexico, California, Sonora, and Chihuahua during the years 1850, '51, '52, and 1853 (1854), a valuable addition to the literature of the South-west. On the north the boundary was also surveyed, and Archibald Campbell and W. J. Twining wrote Reports upon the Survey of the boundary between the territory of the United States and the possessions of great Britain from the Lake of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Barde, Alexandre, 594, 597 Baring-Gould, 500 Bar Kochba, 608 Barlow, Joel, 86, 446, 542, 544 Barlow, S. L. M., 183, 184 Barnard, Frederick A. P., 413, 414 Barnard, Henry, 398, 404, 407, 408, 409 Barnard College, 50 Barnay, 588 Barby, 500 Barnes, 548 Barnett, 365 Barnum, P. T., 21, 23 Baron Rudolph, 274 Barrett, Lawrence, 269 Barrie, J. M., 279, 286, 292 Barriers burned away, 74 Barrows, 213 Barry, Phillips, 512 Barstow, Elizabeth, 44 Bartlett, John R., 153 Barton, William, 429 Bartram, Wm., 540 n. Bascom, John, 210, 229 n., 435 Bastiat, 435 Bateman, Mrs., 275 Bates, Blanche, 281 Batti Batti, 450 Battle cry of freedom, 497 Battle hymn of the Republic, the, 121, 495, 496 Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 181 Baumfeld, Maurice, 589 Beach, Rex, 288 Beade, E. F., 152 Beadle and Adams, 66 Beadle, J. H., 143 Beau Brummell, 278, 283 Beaumarchais, 448 Beaurepaire, Chevalier Quesnay de, 447 Bea