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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Napier Bartlett or search for Napier Bartlett in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
f active service had been seen by the regiment before Captain Waggaman was made lieutenant-colonel, commanding the 10th Louisiana. On the 1st of July, 1862, came the battle of Malvern Hill, and with it came glory and fame to the 10th. The story of the battle is well known, but the account of that charge, less famous, but equally as desperate as that of Balaklava, will bear repetition. The following narrative of it is taken from the Military Record of Louisiana, by the late lamented Napier Bartlett, published some fifteen years ago, viz: A daring attempt in the first place had been made to flank Malvern Hill, but this movement had been met by a superior flanking party of the enemy. The brigade now pressed forward across the open field fronting Malvern Hill, with the ardor of young soldiers panting for their first laurels, and ignorant of the madness which had doomed so many of their numbers to cruel wounds or certain death. As they advance the troops on the flank give way, th