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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 2, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 12, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Bartley or search for Bartley in all documents.

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ire on the bank of the river, and apparently making the best of their condition. Here we were told that shelling had again commenced at three o'clock, but it was supposed that the gunboats were trying to drive the enemy out of the woods. At twelve M., it was said, a flag of truce had been sent in by Forrest. Friday evening, a rebel, who tried to cut the telegraph, was shot dead. Captain Bawkman and Captain Crutchfield, of the Sixteenth Kentucky cavalry, were wounded in the head, and Captain Bartley, in the arm. Sergeant T. Hays, of the Fifteenth Kentucky cavalry, was killed. Four white men and seven negroes in the Fort were killed. Twenty-five houses around the Fort were destroyed by the Federals, because they afforded shelter for sharp-shooters, who could fire directly into the fortification. At Metropolis, we learned that just before the enemy came into the city, all the citizens returned to the Fort, and remained there until Colonel Hicks informed them that he could not furn