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L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 20 2 Browse Search
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Contents. Illustrations. 1.--Miss Clara H. Barton.....................................................................Frontispiece. 2.-Barbara Frietchie .....................................................................Vignette title. 3.-Mrs. Mary A. Bickerdyke ................................................................................. 172 4.-Miss Margaret E. Breckenridge.................................................................... 187 5.-Mrs. Nellie Maria Taylor .................................................... 234 6.-Mrs. Cordelia A. P. Harvey .............................................................................. 260 7.-M Iss Emily E. Parsons.................................................. ..................................... 273 8.-Mrs. Mary Morris husband .................................................................... ... 287 9.-Miss Mary J. Safford........ ............................ .................... .............................. 357
e State Relief agents (Ladies) at Washington the Hospital transport system of the Sanitary Commission Mrs. Harris's, Miss Barton's, Mrs. Fales', Miss Gilson's, and other Ladies' services at the front during the battles of 1862 services of other Le yet in the field or camp hospital. At Cedar Mountain, and in the subsequent battles of August, in Pope's Campaign, Miss Barton, Mrs. T. J. Fales, and some others also brought supplies to the field, and ministered to the wounded, while the shot a hundreds and perhaps thousands would not have seen another morning's light. In the race for Richmond which followed, Miss Barton's train was hospital and diet kitchen to the Ninth Corps, and much of the time for the other Corps also. At Fredericksburg, Mrs. Harris, Mrs. Lee, Mrs. Plummer, Mrs. Fales, and Miss Barton, and we believe also, Miss Gilson, were all actively engaged. A part of the same noble company, though not all, were at Chancellorsville. At Gettysburg, Mrs. Harris was pres
tered to the sick and wounded in camp, field and general hospitals. Clara Harlowe Barton. Early life teaching the Bordentown school Obtains a situatisalt thirty lanterns for that night of gloom the race for Fredericksburg — Miss Barton as a General purveyor for the sick and wounded the battle of Fredericksburgacrifices in maintaining it the grant from Congress personal appearance of Miss Barton If those whom the first blast of the war trump roused and called to livesng in any way with that of others. * In the preparation of this sketch of Miss Barton, we have availed ourselves, as far as practicable, of a paper prepared for uted by quotation marks. To this latter class pre-eminently belongs Miss Clara Harlowe Barton. Quiet, modest, and unassuming in manner and appearance, there is refined womanhood eminently qualifies her to become an independent power. Miss Barton was born in North Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts. Her father, Step