hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 28 results in 10 document sections:

onel Brown commanding — effective strength, three hundred; detachment Forty-eighth regiment New-York State volunteers, Col. Barton commanding — effective strength, three hundred; detachment of First Massachusetts cavalry, Capt. L. Richmond, commandirived off Pocotaligo Creek, at half-past 4 o'clock A. M. with the transport Ben Deford and gunboat Paul Jones. Colonel William Barton, Forty-eighth regiment New-York State volunteers, fifty men Volunteer Engineer corps, and fifty men Third Rhode Iand determined courage during the entire day, and for the able manner in which they handled their several commands. Col. Barton, Forty-eighth regiment New-York State volunteers, as will be seen from the accompanying copy of his report, partially the honor to be, Colonel, most respectfully, your obedient servant, J. M. Brannan, Brigadier-General Commanding. Colonel Barton's report. headquarters U. S. Forces on the Savannah River, Fort Pulaski, Ga., October 23, 1862. Captain: I ha
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 33.-expedition up New River, N. C. (search)
tons of coal, and a few small arms. Steam and anchor again failed to get my vessel afloat. I felt confident that the confederates would come on me in overwhelming force, and it now became my duty to save my men. So all hands were called to muster, and the crew told that they could go aboard the schooner. I called for six volunteers to remain with me on board and fight the remaining gun. Knowing that it was almost certain death, the men came forward, and two masters' mates — Valentine and Barton — were amongst the number; these gentlemen subsequently behaved with coolness and bravery. I ordered the schooner to drop down the channel out of range from the bluffs, and there to wait for the termination of the impending engagement, and if we were destroyed to proceed to sea. Early in the morning the enemy opened on us from four points, with heavy rifled guns, (one a Whitworth.) It was a cross-fire and very destructive. I replied as best I could, but in a short time the engine was di
hundred and sixty-eight prisoners. Our loss was eighteen killed and sixty-eight wounded. This victory opened the whole of that part of the country. General Butler's reports of the military operations in his department are submitted herewith, marked Exhibit No. 7. (See Donaldsonville.) In the department of the South the only military operations which have been undertaken were the reconnoissances of the Pocotaligo and Coosahatchie Rivers. These expeditions under Brig.-Gen. Brannan and Col. Barton, encountered a considerable force of the enemy on the twenty-second of October, and engagements ensued, in which we lost thirty-two killed and one hundred and eighty wounded. The official reports of these engagements are submitted herewith, marked Exhibit No. 8 (See Pocotaligo, S. C.) In the department of North-Carolina our force has also been too small to attempt any important offensive operations. On time sixth of September a party of the enemy surprised the garrison of Washington,
At no time except at Oakland, had I over one thousand nine hundred and twenty-five men, and then I had six hundred infantry and two field-pieces, which came up just at night. The impression prevailed wherever we went that we were the advance of a force of thirty thousand who were to cut off Price. The infantry, sent forward to my support, to Mitchell's Cross-Roads, consisted of the Eleventh Indiana, four hundred, Lieut.-Col. McCauley; Twenty-fourth Indiana, three hundred and seventy, Lieut.-Col. Barton; Twenty-eighth and Thirtieth Iowa, six hundred, Lieut.-Col. Torrence; Iowa battery, Captain Griffith; all under the command of Colonel Spicely of Indiana, an able and efficient officer. Of the temper of both officers and men under my command I cannot speak in too high terms of praise. From the time of my landing at Delta to this time, my command has marched over two hundred miles. The weather for two days out of six has been most inclement, raining incessantly, without tents of any
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barton, William, 1784-1831 (search)
Barton, William, 1784-1831 Military officer; born in Warren, R. I., May 26, 1784. Holding the rank of lieutenant-colonel in the Rhode Island militia, he, with a small party, crossed Narraganset Bay in the night (July 10, 1777) and seized and carried away the British General Prescott (see Prescott, Richard). For this service Congress gave him a sword and a commission of colonel in the Continental army. He was wounded at Bristol Ferry in August, 1778, and was disabled from further servicel party, crossed Narraganset Bay in the night (July 10, 1777) and seized and carried away the British General Prescott (see Prescott, Richard). For this service Congress gave him a sword and a commission of colonel in the Continental army. He was wounded at Bristol Ferry in August, 1778, and was disabled from further service in the war. He was a member of the Rhode Island convention William Barton. which finally adopted the national Constitution. He died in Providence, R. I., Oct. 22, 1831.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rhode Island, (search)
ependence celebrated in Rhode Island, which the Assembly names The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations ......July, 1776 William Ellery and Stephen Hopkins, representing Rhode Island, sign the Declaration of Independence......1776 Eight thousand British troops land and take possession of Rhode Island......Nov. 28, 1776 Gen. John Sullivan, appointed by Washington to succeed Gen. Joseph Spencer in command in Rhode Island, arrives at Providence......April 17, 1777 Col. William Barton, of Providence, with forty men, guided by a negro, Quako Honeyman, captures Gen. Richard Prescott at his quarters, about 5 miles from Newport......July 10, 1777 [Prescott is afterwards (May, 1778) exchanged for Gen. Charles Lee, captured by the British in New Jersey, December, 1776.] Articles of Confederation adopted by Rhode Island......Feb. 9, 1778 British destroy seventy flat-bottomed boats and property on the Kickemuit River, and burn the church and a number of houses at
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
Other substantial contributions were made to the discussion, notably in An essay on the causes of the decline of foreign trade (Philadelphia, 1784); James Swan's A national arithmetic or observations on the finances of Massachusetts (1786); William Barton's The true interest of the United States and particularly of Pennsylvania considered (Philadelphia, 1786); the anonymous Reflections on the policy and necessity of encouraging the Commerce of the citizens of the United States (Richmond, 1786)elody, as has often been the case, was generally known for several years before it was turned to patriotic account. As early as 1764 the familiar quatrain was current in England, and by 1767 the tune was familiar enough in America to be cited in Barton's (or Colonel Forrest's) comic opera, Disappointment, or the force of credulity. In derision of the foolish Yankee there soon began to multiply variants, most of which have come down by hearsay, and are very vague as to date; but one was a broad
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
597 Baring-Gould, 500 Bar Kochba, 608 Barlow, Joel, 86, 446, 542, 544 Barlow, S. L. M., 183, 184 Barnard, Frederick A. P., 413, 414 Barnard, Henry, 398, 404, 407, 408, 409 Barnard College, 50 Barnay, 588 Barby, 500 Barnes, 548 Barnett, 365 Barnum, P. T., 21, 23 Baron Rudolph, 274 Barrett, Lawrence, 269 Barrie, J. M., 279, 286, 292 Barriers burned away, 74 Barrows, 213 Barry, Phillips, 512 Barstow, Elizabeth, 44 Bartlett, John R., 153 Barton, William, 429 Bartram, Wm., 540 n. Bascom, John, 210, 229 n., 435 Bastiat, 435 Bateman, Mrs., 275 Bates, Blanche, 281 Batti Batti, 450 Battle cry of freedom, 497 Battle hymn of the Republic, the, 121, 495, 496 Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 181 Baumfeld, Maurice, 589 Beach, Rex, 288 Beade, E. F., 152 Beadle and Adams, 66 Beadle, J. H., 143 Beau Brummell, 278, 283 Beaumarchais, 448 Beaurepaire, Chevalier Quesnay de, 447 Beauties of Poetry, British
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
. D. Private S. P. Crews, Newton Fletcher, E. Chancey, Joel Griffin, Private Wm. Kelley, Wm. Mann, G. W. Padget. Co. E. Sergeant G. R. Ogden, Corporal W. G. Hunter, John McMullin, Private T. J. Edwards, John S. Griffin, J. W. Lee, W. H. McClelland, W. J. Owens, Private L. W. Roberts, D. F. Ruff, Abraham Williams, Irwin Scott, W. J. Newmans, Richard Harvey, William Norman. Co. F. 1st Sergeant P. B. Perry, Private F. M. Blanchard, David Brown, Wm. Barton, Jas. Duggers, Jos. Drummonds, Private Jno. Flemings, Jos. Gill, Wm. Hamilton, Riley Johns, A. Johns, Thos. Rivers. Co. G. 1st Sergeant E. A. Turnepseed, Private Fred Caperton, Thos. Clarke, R. Croft, Samuel H. Kilgore, Jas. D. Lightner, W. E. Martin, Private Benny Mills, Henry Shaw, N. R. Shaw, Solomon Smith, B. H. Wilson, W. F. Warts. Co. H. 3d Sergeant J. B. Gamelton, 2d Corporal W. L. Cromer, 4th Corporal J. M. Blitch, Private John Altman, Ed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
D, 5th Virginia regiment. H. H. Propst, company F, 62d Virginia regiment. John Rolison, company K, 22d Virginia regiment. J. W. Kessucker, company E, 2d Virginia regiment. Jesse Moss, company G, 51st Virginia regiment. G. Richardson, company E, 4th Virginia regiment. G. W. Massie, company D, 45th Virginia regiment. W. H. Battle, company I, 6th Virginia cavalry. R. Lawson, 14th Virginia cavalry. C. C. Brown, 16th Virginia cavalry. Lewis Hammock, Jackson's Horse artillery. William Barton, Braxton's artillery. Captain W. L. Hardee. C. J. Vacas. J. W. Walton, Fry's battery. North Carolinians. R. T. Cruise, company E, 26th regiment. N. C. Hawis, company C, 23d regiment. Harry Amos, company L, 21st regiment. Alfred Brown, company G, 30th regiment. Wesley Brown, company G, 30th regiment. John Bowers, company F, 5th regiment. James L. Hardister, company I, 5th regiment. J. F. Page, company E, 37th regiment. Moses Ellen, company D, 23d regiment. Jo