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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 22, 1861.., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
Mr. Cobb, the President of the Convention, was sworn by Judge Walker to support it. The oath was then formally administered to all members on the call by States, and the convention was fully organized for business. The convention was composed of the following members: South Carolina.—R. B. Rhett, James Chestnut, Jr., W. P. Miles, T. J. Withers, R. W. Barnwell, C. G. Memminger, L. M. Keitt, W. W. Boyce. Georgia.—Robert Toombs, Howell Cobb, Benjamin H. Hill, Alexander H. Stephens, Francis Bartow, M. J. Crawford, E. A. Nisbett, A. R. Wright, T. R. R. Cobb, A. H. Kenan. Alabama.—Richard W. Walker, J. L. M. Curry, Robert H. Smith, C. J. McRae, John Gill Shorter, S. T. Hale, David P. Lewis, Thomas Fearn, W. P. Chilton. Mississippi.—W. P. Harris, Walter Brooke, A. M. Clayton, W. S. Barry, J. T. Harrison, J. A. P. Campbell, W. S. Wilson. Louisiana.—John Perkins, Jr., D. F. Kenner, C. M. Conrad, Edward Sparrow, Henry Marshall, A. DeClouett. Florida.—Jackson Morton, Jam
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
he Virginia valley army, confronting the force under Patterson, which was much superior in numbers. On hearing of McDowell's advance on Manassas, he eluded Patterson with rare address, and moved to Manassas, taking command as ranking officer. Finding that Beauregard had greatly weakened the left under the idea that McDowell would attempt to turn the Southern right, Johnston directed his own troops to that part of the line. The brunt of the fight was borne by his troops under Jackson, Bee, Bartow and Elzey, and two-thirds of the Southern loss fell upon his men. At a crisis in the battle he himself seized a standard and led a broken regiment back to the fight. Soon after the battle he was made a full general, which was the highest rank in the Confederate service. In the fall he was placed in command of this army, and though it was weaker than at any subsequent winter of the war, and its opponent stronger, he held with it the lines of Centreville, far in advance of any position subse
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
. Stonewall Jackson's brigade also came up and was placed in position. Col. Francis Bartow with two regiments of his brigade, the Seventh Georgia under Col. Luciushe Sudley road. When Evans was about to be overwhelmed by this attack, Bee and Bartow went to his assistance. As Bee advanced under a severe fire, General Beauregaror an hour did these stouthearted men of the blended commands of Bee, Evans and Bartow breast an unintermitting battle-storm, animated surely by something more than t of the regiment, Lieutenant Branch, was killed, and the horse of the regretted Bartow was shot under him. Finally Sherman's and Keyes' Federal brigades, having fouHenry house, and a few yards distant from where Bee fell, the promising life of Bartow, while leading the Seventh Georgia regiment, was quenched in blood. His death the close of 186 1 the Georgia forces at the front in Virginia were as follows: Bartow's old-time brigade—the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Eleventh infantry—under Gen.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
an worker. His religious exhortations were full of fervor and power. None who ever heard him on the great theme of salvation can ever forget his words that burned and kindled in the heart of the hearer the desire for a better life. He also felt a profound interest in education, and was the founder of the Lucy Cobb institute at Athens, one of the best of schools for the higher education of young women. It was named in memory of a beloved and departed daughter. His death, like that of Francis Bartow, on a great battlefield and in the zenith of a useful and brilliant career, produced a profound impression. Brigadier-General Alfred Holt Colquitt Brigadier-General Alfred Holt Colquitt was born in Walton county, Ga., on the 20th of April, 1824. After preparatory study in the schools of his State he entered the celebrated college at Princeton, N. J., where he was graduated in 1844. He was admitted to the bar in 1845, but had practiced but a short time when the Mexican war came on
about four o'clock, in consequence of an attempt of the enemy to throw up breastworks under the disguise of burying their lead. In the general engagement President Davis led the centre, Gen. Beauregard the right wing, and Gen. Johnston the left wing of our army. The Lincoln army was completely routed. Hampton's Legion suffered considerable loss. Sherman's celebrated Battery of Light Artillery was taken by our troops. The fight was very severe and fatal on both sides. Among the prominent officers who are reported to have been killed are Col. Bartow, of Georgia; Gen. Ber, of South Carolina, Gen. Kiery Smith, and Col. Johnson, of the Hampton Legion. The following dispatch was received by Mrs. President Davis late last evening: "We have won a glorious but dear bought victory — the night closed with the enemy in full fight, pursued by our troops." "Jeff. Davis." The reader is referred to our telegraph column for intelligence from the scene of action.
im.General McDowell mortally wounded.the enemy in full retreat.&c. &c., &c. Manassas Junction, July 21. --A battle, lasting ten hours, was fought at Stone Bridge to-day. Gen. Beauregard is again victorious. The slaughter on both sides is tremendous. Gen. Beauregard had a miraculous escape from death. He had his horse shot from under him while leading Hampton's Legion into action. Gen. Johnston seized the colors of a wavering regiment and rallied them to the charge. It is impossible to estimate the number of the dead and wounded. It is reported that the Federal Commander, Gen. McDowell, was mortally wounded. On our side, Col. and acting General, Brigadier General Francis Bartow, of Georgia, was mortally wounded, and is since reported dead. The battle commenced at 8 o'clock A. M., and closed at 6 P. M., with the enemy in full retreat, pursued by our cavalry: President Davis arrived on the battle field after the action had commenced.