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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Francis S. Bartow or search for Francis S. Bartow in all documents.

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ible effect, but our men flinched not until their number had been so diminished by the well-aimed and steady volleys that they were compelled to give way for new regiments. The 7th and 8th Georgia regiments, commanded by the gallant and lamented Bartow, are said to have suffered heavily during the early part of the battle. Kemper's, Shields', and Pendleton's batteries were in this part of the field, and did fearful execution. I regret to be unable to name all the regiments engaged, in their oat our brave Southerners had not been conquered by the overwhelming hordes of the North. It is, however, due to truth to say that the result of this hour hung trembling in the balance. We had lost numbers of our most distinguished officers. Gens. Bartow and Bee had been stricken down; Lieut-Col. Johnson, of the Hampton Legion, had been killed; Col. Hampton had been wounded; but there was at hand the fearless general whose reputation as a commander was staked on this battle: Gen. Beauregard pr
orcements came. These were led on by Colonel Jackson, Colonel Bartow, General Bee, and General Jones. The conflict went onis brigade from Gen. Johnston's forces, I think, was next; Bartow was next; Gen. Bonham next; Gen. Jones was next, and Gen. and Wheat's battalion were slaughtered; there the gallant Bartow fell; and that for many of the bloody hours of the contestupport. That again checked the current for an instant. Col. Bartow then came. That again impeded its resistless progress; e road, and had opened a most galling fire. Gens. Bee and Bartow, and Hampton's Legion, rallied to sustain him. The fight w the hill. Against the first of these it was that Bee and Bartow fought and fell, and at length, at fearful sacrifice of li regiment, I think, of Tennesseeans. Later in the day Colonel Bartow was shot near this spot, while leading the Seventh Geo fell. In the rear was the dead charger of the lamented Gen. Bartow, killed under him, himself to fall soon after. But the
tion in which the importance and splendor of the victory prompts us to indulge. And the death of those noble men causes us to realize our increased obligation to Him who ruleth in the armies of heaven and earth, and to fall down in adoring gratitude, and give the honor of the success to the God whom we serve. His right arm won the victory for our arms, and to Him would we ascribe the glory.--Charleston Courier, July 23. While we rejoice for our success, many homes have the shadow of death round about, and the voice of weeping, the wail of widowhood, the sharp cry of orphanage, are in our land. We have bought our victory dearly, paid for it the purchase-blood of the brave. While we drop a tear for the noble, the manly, the gallant heroic, for our Bartow, and Bee, and Johnson, and Stovall, and the whole long list of glory's children, and while we mourn with their families and friends, let us thus be nerved all the more to strike, strike again.--Atlanta (Ga.) Sentinel, July 23.
reported to have reproached himself for allowing the attack to have been made so soon — prematurely, in fact. But, once begun, the struggle was obstinately maintained by troops half fasting and worn out by a twelve hours march. An official despatch to Richmond from the Confederate camp, says that the Northern troops on the left fought so valiantly and pressed the Southern forces under Gen. Johnston so severely, that the issue seemed doubtful. It was here, the same despatch states, that Col. Bartow's Georgian regiment was posted, which was so terribly cut up that a large body of our troops from the centre was sent at a critical moment to the left's assistance, and turned the tide of the battle. When at length obliged to retire, it is evident that the Northern troops soon fell into disorder. But this, so far from being inexplicable, is only what might naturally be expected under the special circumstances of the case. The army was composed of volunteers, and however well such troop
l Shorter. 8.David P. Lewis. 9.Thomas Fearn. Florida. 1.Jackson Morton. 2.J. P. Anderson. 3.J. B. Owens. Georgia. 1.Robert Toombs. 2.Howell Cobb. 3.Francis S. Bartow. 4.Martin J. Crawford. 5.Eugenius A. Nisbot. 6.Benjamin H. Hill. 7.A. R. Wright. 8.Thomas R. R. Cobb. 9.Augustus H. Kenan. 10.Alex. H. Stephens. LouiOn the Judiciary.--Messrs. Clayton, Withers, Hale, Cobb, Harris. On Naval Affairs.--Messrs. Conrad, Chesnut, Smith, Wright, Owens. On Military Affairs.--Messrs. Bartow, Miles, Sparrow, Kenan, Anderson. On Postal Affairs.--Messrs. Chilton, Boyce, Hill, Harrison, Curry. On Patents.--Messrs. Brooke, Wilson, Lewis, Hill, Karrison, Miles, Chilton, Perkins. On Accounts.--Messrs. Owens, DeClouet, Campbell, Smith, Crawford. On Engrossments.--Messrs. Shorter, Wilson, Kenan, McRae, Bartow Message of Jefferson Davis: delivered at Richmond July 20. Gentlemen of the Congress of the Confederate States of America:-- my message addressed to
ur left, under Brigadier-Generals Evans, Jackson, and Cocke, and Col. Bartow, with the Georgia Brigade, composed of the Seventh and Eighth reenant-Colonel Gardner the Eighth, the whole under the command of Col. Bartow, who led them with a gallantry that was never excelled. It was to retire the Eighth regiment, in order to reform it. Meanwhile, Col. Bartow's horse had been shot from under him. It was observed that the fischarge from the enemy's guns killed the regimental color-bearer. Bartow immediately seized the flag, and again putting himself in the fronttheir hopes, and almost in the arms of victory, the brave and noble Bartow was shot down, the ball striking him in the left breast, just above the heart. Col. Bartow died soon after he was borne from the field. His last words, as repeated to me, were: They have killed me, my braveng the killed are Gen. Bee, of South Carolina; Gen. E. K. Smith, Gen. Bartow, of Georgia; Col. Moore and all the Alabama field officers; Col.