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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Francis S. Bartow or search for Francis S. Bartow in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
ils from the Chatham artillery, under Capt. Joseph S. Cleghorn, an officer who was also charged by the governor with all matters relating to ordnance; from the Savannah Guards, Capt. John Screven, and from the Oglethorpe Light Infantry, Capt. Francis S. Bartow, whose brilliant eloquence had been devoted to the cause of separation. This force, numbering 134 men, was carried by boat to Cockspur island on the morning of the 3d, and the occupation was effected without resistance from the few men to meet at Milledgeville on January 6, 1861, to decide upon the action to be taken by the State of Georgia. Among the delegates were some of the ablest men that Georgia has produced. Immediate secession was advocated by Thomas R. R. Cobb, Francis S. Bartow and Robert Toombs, while Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin H. Hill and Herschel V. Johnson used all their influence for delay until there could be a congress of the Southern States to take united action. But all parties pledged Georgia to re
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ginally a part of the company of that name which went with Bartow to Virginia and was assigned to the Eighth Georgia regimen authorized enlistments for the full term of the war. Francis S. Bartow, captain of the Oglethorpe Light Infantry, of Savannarrespondence is now forgotten except one burning line from Bartow's pen: I go to illustrate Georgia. It was a noble utteransubsequently was assigned to the Eighth regiment, of which Bartow was elected colonel. The earliest regiments enlisted foH. Colquitt; Seventh, Col. L. J. Gartrell; Eighth, Col. Francis S. Bartow; Ninth, Col. E. R. Goulding; Tenth, Col. Lafayetten McLendon. Eighth regiment Georgia volunteers: Col. Francis S. Bartow; Lieut.-Col. John R. Towers; Maj. E. J. Magruder; at Chickamauga and in east Tennessee. Its first colonel, Bartow, commanded a brigade and was killed at First Manassas. Heunteers, Col. L. J. Gartrell; Eighth volunteers, Col: Francis S. Bartow; Ninth volunteers, Col. E. R. Goulding; Tenth volunte
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
on of Virginia the Confederate government hurried troops to that State from every part of the Confederacy, showing great diligence in preparing to defend the soil of the Old Dominion at every point. Of the Georgia regiments ordered there, part were assigned to the army of the Shenandoah commanded by Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. The Second brigade of that army consisted of the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Eleventh Georgia regiments of infantry, and the First Kentucky, and was commanded by Col. Francis S. Bartow. The disposition of the other Georgia troops was as follows: The Sixth and Tenth regiments were sent to Yorktown and vicinity, Col. Lafayette McLaws, with the Tenth, being put in command at Williamsburg; and Ramsey's First, which had experienced soldier life at Pensacola, formed part of the force under Gen. R. S. Garnett at Laurel hill in western Virginia. To this place the First had marched from Staunton, a distance of 120 miles, early in June, 1861. Gen. George B. McClellan, c
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
be found in any city of the Union. Brigadier-General Francis S. Bartow Brigadier-General Francis S. BartoBrigadier-General Francis S. Bartow, a native of Georgia, was at the beginning of the war a prominent lawyer of Savannah and recognized as one ofr before the secession of the State of Georgia. Captain Bartow was in communication with his company, and as ss attached to the Eighth Georgia regiment, of which Bartow was elected colonel; was ordered to Virginia, and bsharp correspondence between Governor Brown and Captain Bartow. It was in one of these communications that BaBartow uttered the memorable saying, I go to illustrate Georgia. And he did illustrate his native State glorioun his official report, speaking of the death of General Bartow, Colonel Fisher and LieutenantCol-onel Johnson,ous charge, the colonel of the same regiment, Francis S. Bartow, was slain. His commission as brigadier-generhis celebrated regiment, and was by the side of General Bartow when the latter received his mortal wound, catc