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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
dier-General Humphreys, Benning, Deas, Clayton, Bate, Brown, Robertson and Manigault. For more detasistance was promptly dispatched under Brigadier-General Bate, who had so successfully maintained ththem to the crest to drive the enemy back. General Bate found the disaster so great that his small y, and that my position was almost surrounded. Bate was immediately directed to form a second line All to the left, however, except a portion of Bate's division, was entirely routed, and in rapid f distressing and alarming state of affairs, General Bate was ordered to hold his position, covering reat disorder, effectually covered, however, by Bate's small command, which had a sharp conflict witdriving it back. After night, all being quiet, Bate retired in good order, the enemy attempting no f our visit to the Governor (the gallant General W. B. Bate), and the House and Senate (both of whicrs by Generals B. F. Cheatham, G. W. Gordon, W. B. Bate, and E. Capers. 2. Biographical sketch of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
around the enemy's position at Chatanooga. I desire to mention the following named officers as distinguished for conduct and ability, viz: Major-Generals Hoods, Buckner, Hindman and Stewart; Brigadier-Generals B. R. Johnson, Preston, Law, (respectively in command of division), Kershaw, Patton, Anderson, Gracie, McNair), (severely wounded), and Colonels Trigg and Kelly, both in command of brigades. Honorable mention should also be made of Brigadier-General Humphreys, Benning, Deas, Clayton, Bate, Brown, Robertson and Manigault. For more detailed accounts of the noble deeds performed by our gallant officers and brave soldiers, I refer you to the reports of my junior officers. The steady good conduct throughout the long conflict of the subordinate officers and men which the limits of this report will not permit me to particularize, is worthy of the highest praise and admiration. I am greatly indebted to Lieutenant-Colonel Sorrel, Assistant Adjutant-General, Lieutenant-Colonel Man
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. (search)
rowned the ridge. Assistance was promptly dispatched under Brigadier-General Bate, who had so successfully maintained the ground in my front,ng troops and return them to the crest to drive the enemy back. General Bate found the disaster so great that his small force could not repaieft had also given way, and that my position was almost surrounded. Bate was immediately directed to form a second line in the rear, where, ight remained intact. All to the left, however, except a portion of Bate's division, was entirely routed, and in rapid flight, nearly all thes character. In this distressing and alarming state of affairs, General Bate was ordered to hold his position, covering the road for the retrade its way back in great disorder, effectually covered, however, by Bate's small command, which had a sharp conflict with the enemy's advance, driving it back. After night, all being quiet, Bate retired in good order, the enemy attempting no pursuit. Lieutenant-General Hardee's co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
heatham and others, were assigned elegant apartments at the Maxwell House, and during our whole stay were treated with the enthusiastic cordiality which old Confederates know so well how to bestow. Of our visit to the Governor (the gallant General W. B. Bate), and the House and Senate (both of which bodies adjourned to be introduced to the General), our inspection of the beautiful capitol building, the library, etc.,—our charming visit to the venerable and accomplished widow of President Polk—oeless is chairman,) but may say that we have every prospect of a large and interesting meeting, We have already the promise of the following papers: I. The Battle of Franklin. Discussed in papers by Generals B. F. Cheatham, G. W. Gordon, W. B. Bate, and E. Capers. 2. Biographical sketch of General Bedford Forrest—By Rev. Dr. Kelly. 3. Sketch of Major Strange, of Forrest's Staff—By Colonel M. C. Galloway, of Memphis. 4. Tishomingo Creek (Sturgis's Raid)—By Captain John W. Morto
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General S. B. Buckner of the battle of Chickamauga. (search)
al conduct, I respectfully refer you to the reports of the division, brigade, and regimental commanders, and of the chief and battalion commanders of the artillery, which are herewith transmitted. To the gentlemen of my staff I am indebted for their prompt and gallant discharge of duty on every occasion. No commendation from me can add to the well earned reputation of Major-General Stewart and his able brigadiers—Johnston, who was detached, and in command of an improvised division, Brown, Bate and Clayton. They were worthy leaders of the brave troops, nearly all of them veterans, whom they so gallantly led. Upon Brigadier-General Preston and his brigade commanders, Brigadier-General Gracie, and Colonels Trigg and Kelly, I cannot bestow higher praise than to say, that their conduct and example were such as to convert a body of troops, but few of whom had before been under fire, into a division of veterans in their first battle. Stewart's veterans maintained the reputation they